Browsing named entities in Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for July 17th or search for July 17th in all documents.

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Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States. (search)
t the offer. The Senate, June 12th, on motion of Mr. Haywood, of North Carolina, by a vote of 38 to 12, passed a resolution, advising the acceptance of the British offer. It only remained to complete the formalities of diplomacy. June 15, the treaty was signed by James Buchanan on the part of the United States, and Richard Pakenham on the part of Great Britain. It was laid before the Senate for ratification June 16th and was ratified June 18th. Ratifications were exchanged at London, July 17th, and the President, in a message to Congress, August 5th, communicated the exchange of ratifications and recommended the organization of a territorial government for Oregon. (See Benton's Abridgment, vol. 15, pp. 652, 653, 641.) The several measures proposed for the government of Oregon and the territories formed from the Mexican cessions of 1848, and for the further admission of States, aroused anew the slavery agitation, and provoked the irrepressible conflict. These questions, lead
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
us urged, the President requested Greeley to go quietly to Niagara Falls and find out what he could; a request which the great peacemaker eagerly accepted. Mr. George N. Sanders, a prominent politician of the Douglas school, was found to be at the Clifton House, from whom it appears the first communication was made July 12, 1864, to Mr. Greeley that Hon. Clement C. Clay, James P. Holcombe and George N. Sanders were ready to go to Washington if granted a safe passport. Mr. Greeley replied July 17th to the note of Mr. Sanders by addressing his letter to Clay, Jacob Thompson and Holcombe, and stating that he was informed they were duly accredited from Richmond as the bearer of propositions looking to the establishment of peace, and tendering safe conduct. Immediately on receiving this communication Clay and Holcombe responded that they were not duly accredited, as stated, but that they were authorized to declare that if the circumstances disclosed in the correspondence were communicat