Browsing named entities in Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for North or search for North in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 1 document section:

Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
nd with the idea of division of the States was the disruption of the Democratic national convention, which met in Charleston, S. C., April 11, 1860. There were present at this convention complete delegations from all the States, South as well as North, representing the nationality of the great party then in power, and harmonious on all questions, except on the application of the doctrine of non-intervention by Congress with slavery in the territories. The power to legislate against slave propThis proposition received the votes of four Northern States, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island. On the other hand, it was objected to on the first vote by three Southern States, Virginia, North Carolina, and Missouri; Virginia and North. Carolina objecting because of the clause which referred the legal status of slavery south of the line to the decisions of Federal courts, while the first clause made prohibition absolute without such reference; while Missouri disliked it becaus