hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 476 2 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 164 8 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 160 20 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 131 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 114 6 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 102 2 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 68 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 59 3 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 45 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 33 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Zachary Taylor or search for Zachary Taylor in all documents.

Your search returned 35 results in 4 document sections:

Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Legal justification of the South in secession. (search)
general welfare were to be made by Congress upon the States. By the second, Congress is empowered to lay taxes, under certain restrictions, to provide for the common defense and general welfare. A sovereign or absolute right to dispose of these requisitions or taxes without any restriction is not given to Congress by either. The general terms used in both are almost literally the same and, therefore, they must have been used in both under the same impression of their import and effect. (Taylor's Construction Construed, 55.) An obiter dictum of Justice Miller, of the Supreme court, gives point to the value of restrictions and of enforcing them. To lay with one hand the power of the government on the property of the citizen, and with the other to bestow it upon favored individuals to aid private enterprises and build up private fortunes is none the less a robbery because it is done under the favor of the law. The Constitution made by States. As everything in this discus
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States. (search)
k and well nigh absurd to wait indefinitely on the sullen moods of Mexico. General Taylor, in obedience to orders, advanced to the Rio Grande, taking position opposiArista crossed the Rio Grande with an army of 8,000 men and moved to attack General Taylor. It is no part of our purpose to recount the events of the Mexican war. g that the United States had forced war and that the military occupation by General Taylor was the beginning of it. The first act of actual hostility was made by Mexiinst Point Isabel and the attack at Fort Brown and the efforts to intercept General Taylor's march to its relief at Palo Alto May 8th and Resaca de la Palma May 9th. of the United States, vol. 4, p. 528.) In addition to the movements of Generals Taylor and Scott into the heart of Mexico, expeditions were planned to take possetates at the close of the war. Her military power had been crushed by Scott and Taylor, and Mexico was helpless. It now remained for the victors to dictate terms.
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
n Buren, the anti-slavery candidate, supported Taylor with such earnestness and skill as to carry New York and thus make Taylor president. Webster took decided ground for Taylor and Clay came also toTaylor and Clay came also to his support. The contest between Cass and Van Buren finally became in New York, in a very large deic principle. The public policy outlined by Taylor, the Presidentelect from the South, in the begtion of sectional equilibrium. Upon that idea Taylor's administration began. But a rush for the for immediate admission into the Union. President Taylor recommended the admission of the State oflay's plan of settlement differed from that of Taylor, and his administration actively opposed it. Brepresenting two-thirds of the States. President Taylor's death in July, 1850, at the moment of tstruction of his cavalry by Forrest. In April Taylor attacked Banks at Mansfield, Louisiana, and drf State troops was contemplated. Kirby Smith, Taylor, Stephen D. Lee and Forrest were still in posi[1 more...]
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
ns of Miss Sallie Knox Taylor, daughter of Zachary Taylor, commanding the First infantry, to whom heOrleans, which he conducted to the army of General Taylor on the Rio Grande. He had succeeded in ared on the field until the victory was won. General Taylor's dispatch of March 6, 1847, makes special Butler's division, and was recommended by General Taylor for promotion to brigadier-general for his the Shenandoah valley. At Port Republic, General Taylor and his Louisianians were assigned to attaose of the Seven Days battles before Richmond, Taylor was promoted major-general upon the recommendaing. Amidst these discouraging conditions General Taylor set about the task of restoring confidenceks, and 7,000 from Arkansas under Steele. General Taylor was able to give battle at Mansfield with Federal army crossed the Atchafalaya, leaving Taylor in undisturbed possession of his department. movement of their troops to the advice of General Taylor, and entire confidence existed between the[7 more...]