Browsing named entities in Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Greenville (Mississippi, United States) or search for Greenville (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States. (search)
is remarkable; East Tennessee had an abolition paper nine or ten years before the advent of Garrison's paper. As early as 1814 or 1815 an abolition society, perhaps the first in the United States, had been formed in East Tennessee. See article by S. A. Link, American Historical Magazine, October, 1896, p. 333. In April, 1820, the first number of The Emancipator was issued at Jonesboro, by Elihu Embree. After the death of Embree, The Genius of Universal Emancipation was published at Greenville by Benjamin Lundy. This lived until 1824. Lundy induced Garrison to enter the field of editorial effort in behalf of emancipation. * * * (See Article by Rev. E. E. Hoss, entitled Elihu Embree, Abolitionist, in April number, 1897, of the American Historical Magazine.) When the slave trade was abolished in 1808, the Northern States had already found slavery unprofitable. There was no cogent interest to withhold them from yielding to sentiments of philanthropy or from following sound p