Browsing named entities in Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Poolesville (Maryland, United States) or search for Poolesville (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: Maryland under Federal military power. (search)
0. He could just as well have had a recorded majority of 300,000. The marshal of police, George P. Kane, the police commissioners, and the mayor of Baltimore had been arrested in July and imprisoned at Fort Lafayette. Thus, at the beginning of the year 1862, the Federal army of occupation was commanded by Major-General Dix in Baltimore; Hooker in Charles county, and along the Potomac, south of Washington, Generals McClellan, Keyes and Casey; in and around Washington, General Stone at Poolesville, and Banks at Darnestown, up to Williamsport, General Kelly at Cumberland, where he was relieved early in January by General Lander. It had elected Augustus W. Bradford governor, and a subservient legislature in November, 1861. The judiciary was deposed and dragged from the bench. Judge Robert B. Carmichael, illustrious for a long life of private virtue and public service, was seized on the bench in his court house at Easton in Talbot county, knocked senseless with a revolver on the v
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: the Maryland Line. (search)
a passenger train on which was Major-General Franklin of the Federal army, who subsequently escaped during the night, and reported as per orders on the 4th, at Poolesville. Johnson, after burning the bridge at Cockeysville, turned round and rode rapidly around north of Baltimore. When five miles from that city, it was reported ts good a soldier and as gallant a gentleman as ever rode a horse in that war. From Rockville, still covering the rear, Johnson's brigade followed the army to Poolesville, where during half the day it covered Early, recrossing the Potomac. His trains were long, piled with plunder, and his herds of cattle and horses very large. Days battles. It fired the first gun in Early's advance into Maryland in 1864, when he crossed the Potomac at Shepherdstown, and the last, when he recrossed at Poolesville. It struck the first blow and shed the first blood of the revolution in Baltimore on the 19th of April, 1861, and made the last charge at Appomattox, April 9,
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), chapter 11 (search)
ddletown, Winchester, Hagerstown, Morton's Ford, Brandy Station, Auburn or Cedar Creek, Buckland, Gainesville, Taylorsville, Pollard's Farm, Old Church, Beaver Dam, Dabney's Ferry, Ashland, Trevilian's Station, Leetown, Bladensburg, Rockville, Poolesville, Gettysburg, Martinsburg, Charlestown, Bunker Hill, Fisher's Hill, Madison C. H., Liberty Mills, High Bridge, Appomattox. Second Maryland cavalry. No official muster rolls of this command having been found, a partial list is given from Harrisonburg, Cross Keys, Gaines' Mill, Dispatch Station, Malvern Hill, Second Manassas, Harpers' Ferry, Moorfield, Sharpsburg, Kernstown, Carlisle, Pa., Gettysburg, Hagerstown, Mine Run, Brandy Station, Old Town, Yellow Tavern, Martinsville, Poolesville, Maurytown. Third Maryland artillery. Captain, Henry B. Latrobe, Ferd. O. Claiborne, John B. Rowan, Wm. L. Ritter. Lieutenants, Ferdinand O. Claiborne, W. Thompson Patten, Holmes Erwin, T. D. Giles, J. W. Doncaster. Assistant-Surgeon