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D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 4 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 4 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 1, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Basil C. Manly or search for Basil C. Manly in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 8 document sections:

e Tenth regiment was composed of five batteries of light artillery and five of heavy. J. J. Bradford was its first colonel, but the regiment was, in the nature of things, always scattered. The equipping of this regiment was slow and trying. The first battery ready was a magnificent body of men, and was armed with the light guns seized in the Fayetteville arsenal—the only complete battery in the State. It elected Lieut. S. D. Ramseur first captain; on his promotion it was commanded by Basil C. Manly, and then by B. B. Guion. The next was Reilly's hard-fighting Rowan light battery This battery was equipped with guns captured at Manassas. After Reilly's promotion to major, Capt. John A. Ramsey commanded it to the end of the war. Capt. T. H. Brem, of Charlotte, organized another of the light batteries, and with rare patriotism advanced out of his private means the money to buy uniforms, equipment and horses. Capts. Joseph Graham and A. B. Williams succeeded to the command. When th
division contained few North Carolinians. The Thirteenth, Col. A. M. Scales, and the Fourteenth, Col. P. W. Roberts, and Manly's battery, were the State's sole representatives in that part of the battle. Both of these regiments were in Colston's bhe compliments both Scales and Roberts on having discharged their difficult duties with marked skill and fearlessness. Manly's North Carolina battery made an enviable record in this battle. Five of its guns were posted in Fort Magruder, and one under Lieutenant Guion was in a redoubt. When Webber's battery, afterward captured, was trying to get in position, Manly's guns, the first of which was fired by Sergeant Brooks, largely aided the infantry in so disabling it that it never rendered eeparately, but Major Daves states it at 147. Regimental History. During General Smith's action, Guion's section of Manly's battery was active just in rear of Whiting's brigade, and one of his limbers bore to the rear the Confederate commander
ent and three Georgia regiments, left Brownsville, two miles from the gap, about 5 o'clock, to reinforce Munford. On their arrival they went promptly at their enemies. Weight of numbers soon broke their thin line, and left the gap to Franklin. Manly's battery was engaged here all day, and General Semmes reports that it did good service in breaking the enemy's line by its deliberate and well-directed fire. Cobb's total force, as stated by him, Official Report. did not exceed 2,200, while eventh and Thirty-seventh were the regiments principally engaged. They fought well, and assisted in driving back three separate and distinct columns of the enemy. The artillery came in for a full share of fighting in this campaign. Latham's, Manly's, and Reilly's batteries did hard service. Manly's was especially commended for active and accurate service at Crampton's gap. At Sharpsburg, Major Frobel, chief of artillery, highly applauds Reilly's conduct of his guns. He reports: I cannot
ont line without much cover. Pender's North Carolina brigade, Lane's North Carolina brigade, and Archer's mixed brigade were on A. P. Hill's front line. They were supported by the brigades of Thomas, Gregg and Brockenbrough, respectively. Taliaferro and Early formed a third line, and D. H. Hill's division was in reserve. Marye's hill was occupied by the Washington artillery; the reserve artillery was on its right and left. The division batteries of Anderson, Ransom and McLaws, including Manly's North Carolina battery, were stationed along the line. On Jackson's front, fourteen pieces of artillery, including a section of Latham's battery, were posted under Lieutenant-Colonel Walker, and Stuart's horse artillery and cavalry were on Jackson's right flank. North Carolina had present in the army thus drawn up, thirty-two regiments and one battalion of infantry, two regiments of cavalry, and three batteries of artillery. Two division commanders and six brigade commanders were also f
s brigade found opportunity to move down a ravine and take Howe in flank. This compelled Howe's hasty withdrawal. General Hoke was wounded in this charge. His brigade lost first and last 230 men. As Sedgwick was retreating toward the river, Manly's battery was called into play, and General Wilcox said: Captain Manly's battery rendered valuable service in shelling the retreating enemy near Banks' ford. Twenty of the enemy were wounded by this shelling and fell into our hands the next day,Captain Manly's battery rendered valuable service in shelling the retreating enemy near Banks' ford. Twenty of the enemy were wounded by this shelling and fell into our hands the next day, and many were killed. The total Federal killed and wounded in this series of battles reached 12,216; they also lost 5,711 prisoners. Rebellion Records, XXV, I, pp. 185, 191. The total Confederate loss in killed and wounded was as follows: killed, 1,581; wounded, 8,700; total, 10,281. North Carolina had fewer regiments than usual with General Lee at this time. Both Ransom's and Cooke's brigades were on other duty. There were present in General Lee's army in these battles, 124 regiments
iumph. On the morning of the second day at Gettysburg and in the early afternoon, no North Carolina troops were in the assaulting forces. Four North Carolina batteries were posted along the center and right of the Confederate lines. These were Manly's, Reilly's, Latham's and Capt. Joseph Graham's. They faithfully executed the duties assigned them, and were under fire and engaged as circumstances required. In the late afternoon, Johnson's division was ordered to assail Culp's hill. One of a losses in these cavalry operations, so far as reported, were, killed, 9; wounded, 79. There is no report from the First nor the Second regiment. In the cavalry fight at Funkstown, the North Carolina troops took part on the 16th of July, and Manly's North Carolina battery was engaged nearly all day, losing several men. Pettigrew's North Carolinians formed the rear guard when the Potomac was recrossed at Falling Waters on the 14th of July. There a portion of the Sixth Michigan cavalry r
(now under Brig.-Gen. W. R. Cox), Johnston's, Cooke's, Kirkland's (now under MacRae), Lane's, Scales', and Hoke's (under Lewis and later Godwin) brigades, and the remnants of the First and Third regiments subsequently assigned to General Cox's brigade. Then operating on the flanks was Gordon's gallant brigade of cavalry, the First, Second and Fifth, commanded after Gordon's death by General Barringer. Of the batteries present, the records show only Flanner's, Ramsey's, and Williams', but Manly's also was there. The reports from the artillery all through the war are very unsatisfactory in detail, and those faithful men are rarely mentioned except for some unusually brilliant service such as that of Williams' battery in the Wilderness. Forty-three regiments of infantry, three of cavalry and four batteries of artillery were then North Carolina's representatives in this disastrous repulse of Grant's army. On the 1st of June, the Sixth corps and most of the Eighteenth corps were
army, small but entirely pugnacious, to fight his foes in detail. With this general plan in mind, it is necessary to notice the troops with which he purposed to carry it out. Coming from the South under Generals Hardee, Cheatham and S. D. Lee, were the veteran fragments of Cleburne's, Cheatham's, Loring's, Taliaferro's, b. H. Hill's, Walthall's and Stevenson's divisions of infantry, and Hampton's consolidated cavalry. Hoke's division consisted of four very small but veteran brigades. Major Manly's and Major Rhett's artillery battalions accompanied Hardee's corps. In addition, the following troops were found in North Carolina; four regiments of Junior reserves under Cols. C. W. Broadfoot, J. H. Anderson, J. W. Hinsdale and Charles M. Hall—all under General Baker. At Fort Caswell, the First North Carolina battalion, Col. T. M. Jones; the Third North Carolina battalion, Capt. J. G. Moore, and the Sampson artillery were stationed. At Fort Campbell there were three companies of Nor