hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 31, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 13, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for R. M. McKinney or search for R. M. McKinney in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

From the material assembled at Raleigh, the First regiment was soon formed and hurried away to Virginia under Major Hill, whom it elected colonel. Then, says Major Gordon, whose excellent article on the Organization of the Troops furnishes many of these facts, the Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth and Seventh soon followed. The first six were sent to Virginia, the Seventh to Hatteras. These regiments were under the following colonels: Solomon Williams, W. D. Pender, Junius Daniel, R. M. McKinney, Stephen Lee and W. F. Martin. However, many of them were soon reorganized. Between the 15th of June and the 18th of July, the Eighth, Colonel Radcliffe; the Tenth, Colonel Iverson; the Eleventh, Colonel Kirkland; the Twelfth, Colonel Pettigrew; the Thirteenth, Colonel Hoke; the Fourteenth, Colonel Clarke, were organized. It will be noticed that no Ninth regiment is included in these fourteen. There was some controversy about the officers of this regiment, and this number was subseq
ttacking and two supporting companies of the Third Vermont regiment crossed the stream and rushed gallantly for the Confederate works. The part of the works immediately in their front was occupied by the Fifteenth North Carolina regiment, Col. R. M. McKinney. The regiment at the time of the Federal attack was not on its lines, but was about 200 yards in the rear, engaged on some heavy intrenchments that it had been ordered to make. When the pickets gave the alarm, the Fifteenth rushed to itsrefuge behind the earth thrown from the Confederate rifle-pits, Ibrie's official report. and opened upon the North Carolinians, as they advanced, an accurate and deadly fire. The fire was promptly returned and several volleys exchanged. Colonel McKinney of the Fifteenth was killed in the advance. The Seventh Georgia and other adjoining regiments, none knowing the strength of the attacking party, rushed to the aid of the North Carolinians, and in a few moments the little band of Vermont men