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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 190 22 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 93 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 59 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 42 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 38 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 33 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 9 1 Browse Search
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865 8 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Washington, Ga. (Georgia, United States) or search for Washington, Ga. (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
ld. When Sherman began his march to Savannah, he harassed the Federal flank until within a few miles of Savannah, when he left his horses on the South Carolina side of the river, after swimming it, and entering Savannah with his men as infantry, covered the rear of Hardee's army at the evacuation. He subsequently operated in southern Georgia until ordered to Danville, Va., but on reaching Greensboro was ordered back, escorting President Davis from Charlotte to Abbeville, and as far as Washington, Ga., where his command was disbanded. He then made his home in Mississippi, and practiced law at Greenville. In 1876 he was made president of the board of Mississippi levee commission for several counties, and in 1883 became a member of the United States river commission. In 1894 he returned to his native city of Charleston, and devoted himself to the profession of civil engineering. In 1898 he offered his services for the war with Spain. Brigadier-General Martin Witherspoon Gary
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
in the fall of 1861, despite his youth, he became a member of the Carolina light infantry, First rifle regiment. At the reorganization in 1862 he enlisted as a private in the Palmetto Guards, an independent organization, with which he was on duty during the remainder of the war, at various points in the Carolinas, Georgia, and Florida, but chiefly in front of Charleston. The close of the war found him sick in the hospital at Chester, and about the 1st of July, 1865, he was paroled at Washington, Ga. He then returned to Charleston, but his health continued much broken, and he went to England for a year for its restoration, during which time he was engaged in business in the towns of Riverport and Liverpool. Subsequently he was in business at Charleston until 1871, when he removed to Greenville, where he has had a successful and useful career in connection with the cotton mills and other industries, as manager and as secretary. For the past eight years he has been secretary of the