Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Hooker or search for Hooker in all documents.

Your search returned 22 results in 5 document sections:

Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
ost brilliant of all Lee's victories. With 60,000 men he attacked and defeated Hooker's army, 130,000 strong. Into this struggle the Georgians of the army of Northeof the Rappahannock river near Chancellorsville by the United States army under Hooker, the brilliant flank movement of Jackson's corps, the rout of Howard's corps, t. E. B. Stuart, the tenacious defense of Fredericksburg and the total defeat of Hooker. Wright's Georgians were among the first to meet the enemy at Chancellorsvilgade, as has been noted, fought on the line confronting the forward movement of Hooker from Chancellorsville. It was the chief participant in the defeat of Sykes' dittacks, to be specially mentioned. When Lee moved with the main army to meet Hooker at Chancellorsville, he left Early with his division, Barksdale's brigade, and artillery under General Pendleton, to hold Sedgwick in check. On Sunday, while Hooker was being pressed back to Chancellorsville, Sedgwick crossed at Fredericksburg
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
general control of Federal operations in the West, replaced Rosecrans with Thomas, arrived at Chattanooga over the mountains on the 20th of October, and about a week later, two corps from the Federal army in Virginia, Howard's and Slocum's, under Hooker, took possession of Bridgeport and the river almost up to Lookout mountain. Supplies immediately began pouring into Chattanooga. Generals Bragg and Longstreet examined the Federal operations from the summit of Lookout on the 28th, and Geary's dtreet, Hardee and Breckinridge were ordered to examine the situation on Lookout creek with a view to a general battle, but they decided that the difficulty of crossing the mountain prevented all hope of success. Our position was so faulty that we could not accomplish that which was hoped for. We were trying to starve the enemy out by investing him on the only side from which he could not have gathered supplies, was Longstreet's expression of the situation after Hooker occupied Lookout valley.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 14: (search)
while Sherman suddenly appeared on the right, crossing the river and making a resolute assault. Hooker crossed Lookout and forced the gap at Rossville. From either flank there came to the ConfederatYet it should not be concluded that the Federal charge up the slope of Missionary ridge, or that Hooker's fight on Lookout mountain, or Sherman's assault on the Confederate right, was unattended by lond his heroes received the thanks of Congress. It was Cleburne's battle, and though he only had Hooker to whip, it was a glorious performance, considering that the Union army had just achieved the gr. Cleburne's division, silent, but cool and ready, was the only barrier to the eager advance of Hooker's corps, the division of Osterhaus in front, Geary following, and Cruft in the rear. The Federal skirmishers were in view advancing shortly after 8 a. m., and under their fire Hooker formed his lines of battle and moved with the utmost decision and celerity against the ridge on the north.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
as made. The fight on the 15th was inaugurated by the advance of Hooker, which Hindman's line bravely met. Although several vigorous assaulnear Calhoun, McPherson was marching toward Rome, and Schofield and Hooker on the left toward Cassville. Johnston, not finding a good positther from the railroad than at any other period of the campaign. Hooker pushed across Pumpkin Vine creek toward New Hope church, and was me in all 300 men, who for some time made a resolute resistance. But Hooker crowded them back, and an hour and a half before sunset the Federale, Hood, on the left, was involved in a bloody fight with troops of Hooker and Schofield. Hood reported that Hindman and Stevenson had been ahofield, leaving Newton's division at the crossing place. Parts of Hooker's and Palmer's corps also crossed, Palmer meeting with considerabletwo flags. On the 20th, Thomas was comparatively isolated, with Hooker's and Palmer's corps and Newton's division of Howard's, perhaps 30,
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
ay. At Fredericksburg the brigade of Semmes was a part of the force at Marye's hill that hurled back the hosts of Burnside with such fearful slaughter. At Chancellorsville again General Semmes led his brigade into the fierce conflict, first with Hooker, then with Sedgwick at Salem church. In the fighting of the first day at Gettysburg, General Semmes fell mortally wounded. General Lee said in his report that Semmes was leading his brigade with the courage that always distinguished him, and thather's staff, was severely wounded, losing a leg, and at Sharpsburg the general himself was borne from the field wounded. He recovered in time to lead his brigade in the battle of Fredericksburg, and again at Chancellorsville in the attack upon Hooker and afterward upon Sedgwick. In the second day's fight at Gettysburg, Wright broke through and seized the Union batteries, but not being properly supported was obliged to fall back. During the Overland campaign of 1864 and in the fighting aroun