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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 183 11 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 80 36 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 22 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 16 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 19, 1864., [Electronic resource] 14 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 0 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Ackworth, Ga. (Georgia, United States) or search for Ackworth, Ga. (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
d forward on his left flank, requiring Johnston to transfer Polk's corps to Hood's right toward Acworth. The Federals intrenched and allowed the day to pass without combat except a gallant cavalry eoad with his main command. Stoneman and Schofield worked their way down on that line as far as Acworth on June 3d, and Sherman finally established connection. From Dallas, he had been fighting his l about 300 feet high and considerably to the front of the main line; Polk's right was near the Acworth and Marietta road east of the railroad, covered by Noonday creek; and Hood was massed on the right of the Acworth road. The cavalry extended this line to the right and left. Between the 1st and 4th of June, Wheeler's troops captured about 100 prisoners. After a succession of skirmishes, theythe railroad in order to bring up supplies. On the 8th of June, Gen. Frank P. Blair arrived at Acworth with about 9,000 men of the Seventeenth corps and a brigade of cavalry. This accession of forc
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
100 miles while his own cavalry went 10. I have sent two divisions up to Chattanooga and one to Rome, and Thomas started to-day to clear out Tennessee. As soon as advised of Hood's crossing of the Chattahoochee toward his rear, Sherman left General Slocum and his corps to guard Atlanta and the Chattahoochee bridge, and started northward in pursuit of Hood with five corps. Hood reached the vicinity of Lost mountain on the 3d, and on the 4th General Stewart's corps struck the railroad at Acworth and Big Shanty, capturing 400 prisoners and some stores. Major-General French's division, about 3,000 strong, was sent against Allatoona, one of Sherman's most important depots, where were stored about 1,000,000 rations. The Federal garrison of 890 men, under Colonel Tourtellotte, had been reinforced by Gen. John M. Corse with one brigade, 1,054 strong, from Rome, the orders being transmitted mainly by the signal stations established on the summits of the hills and mountains along the Fed