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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 666 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 174 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 124 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 74 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 48 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 46 22 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 42 0 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 40 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 32 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Kenesaw (Nebraska, United States) or search for Kenesaw (Nebraska, United States) in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
s themselves Kentuckians going to join the Southern army. Thus Andrews and his men subjected themselves to being treated as spies. The object of the foolhardy scheme was to break up railroad communication south of Chattanooga, so that Buell might capture that point from the west and north. Andrews with nineteen of the men reached the rendezvous in time. Buying their tickets to various points as regular passengers, they boarded the northward bound mail train. At Big Shanty, now known as Kenesaw, while the train stopped for breakfast, Andrews and his men hurried forward and uncoupled a section of the train, consisting of three empty box cars connected with the engine, which they at once managed by two experienced men detailed for that purpose. The engine pulled off rapidly and was gone before the sentinels standing near suspected the movement. William A. Fuller, conductor of the train, and Anthony Murphy, foreman of the Atlanta machine shops, who happened to be on the train, at
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
ietta, his right on the railroad; General Thomas on Kenesaw and Pine mountains, and General Schofield off towarerman prepared to attempt to break the line between Kenesaw and Pine mountains, and on the morning of the 14th,ed on the north between the railroad at the foot of Kenesaw and the Canton road, Loring on the mountain, and Haham in order. This was an admirable position, with Kenesaw as a salient from which all the movements of the ener of his troops before the impregnable defenses of Kenesaw. In the plan of battle, McPherson was to attack nee of these attacks, near the southwest extremity of Kenesaw, on the Burnt Hickory road, fell upon Cockrell's Mi assisted by the furious fire from French's guns on Kenesaw, which stopped the enemy before he reached Walker's, and 9 were captured in the battle of June 27th at Kenesaw. Only half of the company present for duty were intactics, ordering McPherson from the north front of Kenesaw to extend Schofield's line toward the Chattahoochee
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
ermitted to unite with those who met the enemy. Nor were the places of our absent sons filled by troops from other States. One brigade of Confederate troops was sent by the President from North Carolina, which reached Georgia after her capital was in possession of the enemy. For eight months the Confederate reserves, reserve militia, detailed men, exempts, and most State officers, civil as well as military, had kept the field almost constantly, participating in every important fight from Kenesaw to Honey Hill. If the sons of Georgia under arms in other States had been permitted to meet the foe upon her own soil, without other assistance, General Sherman's army could never have passed from the mountains to the seaboard. In conclusion, Governor Brown claimed that Georgia during the fall and winter had a larger proportion of her white male population under arms than any other State in the Confederacy. We will now describe the gallant but fruitless effort of General Hood to res