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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,126 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 528 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 402 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 296 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 246 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 230 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 214 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 180 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 174 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 170 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) or search for North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 34 results in 10 document sections:

Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
that time until Johnston's capitulation in North Carolina, in the army of Tennessee. Additional pare army of Tennessee until the surrender in North Carolina, April 26, 1865. The next command organs. This regiment served for awhile on the North Carolina coast and then in the army of Northern Virinia until after Chancellorsville, then in North Carolina; also in Florida at Olustee, again in Virginia in 1864, and in North Carolina with Joe Johnston in 1865. Colonel Colquitt was promoted to brigtime of the battle of Gettysburg it was in North Carolina. It went with the other regiments of Colqunder Lee. In the spring of 1865 it was in North Carolina under General Johnston, and surrendered wiparticipated in the Atlanta, Tennessee and North Carolina campaigns, surrendering with J. E. Johnstotime until after Chancellorsville, then in North Carolina; went with the rest of Colquitt's brigade lorsville; went with Colquitt's brigade to North Carolina; hurried to the defense of Florida, helpin
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
Carrick's ford and First Manassas death of Bartow-Cheat mountain, Greenbrier river and camp Alleghany Georgians in North Carolina-events at Pensacola. Immediately after the secession of Virginia the Confederate government hurried troops to thatpedition was feared at all points of the coast, some of the Georgians who had been called to Virginia were ordered to North Carolina for service. M. A. Stovall's Third battalion, the Twenty-fourth, and Colonel Wofford's Eighteenth were at Goldsboro;n November Stovall's battalion was transferred to east Tennessee. The Third Georgia, Col. A. R. Wright, moved into North Carolina early in September, for the purpose of reinforcing Fort Hatteras, but that yielding to the enemy before they could reederal steamer Monticello, but sustained no loss. This exploit of the Georgians was the only episode during 1861, in North Carolina, which resulted in advantage to the Confederate arms. In December the Third was sent to Savannah. The Georgia vol
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
regiments. After long and faithful service it surrendered with Johnston in North Carolina. The Thirty-seventh regiment Georgia volunteers had for its field officee detachments of the regiment were ordered to report to General Johnston in North Carolina, but the war ended before the order could be obeyed. The regiment had the ar, the Eighth Georgia cavalry. They served for a time in Georgia, then in North Carolina, then in the brigade of Gen. James Dearing, at Petersburg, in 1864. The Sihat State about two weeks after the battle of Fredericksburg. It served in North Carolina for a time, then in the Richmond campaign of 1864. It was also one of the ervice in Virginia. After being engaged at Fredericksburg it was sent into North Carolina. Then in the spring of 1864 it returned to Virginia and was constantly engs of the Twentieth Georgia battalion. The Sixty-second had been serving in North Carolina and Virginia, and the Twentieth battalion had served in Georgia and Virgini
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
f McClellan, probably the greatest assembled in behalf of the Confederacy during the war, included 186 regiments and battalions of infantry, among which Virginia as the invaded territory properly had 5th, the largest number. Georgia had 38; North Carolina, including the troops of her department, furnished 36; South Carolina, 15; Alabama, 15; Mississippi, 10; Louisiana, 11, and other States smaller numbers. Lee's plan to bring Stonewall Jackson to his assistance and crush McClellan before rewar began, says General Wright, these brave and daring Louisianians and Georgians charged through the open field and actually drove from their cover the whole brigade, supposed at the time to be Sickles'. Soon after this Colonel Rutledge's North Carolina regiment, supported by the Third Georgia, Maj. J. R. Sturges, aided by Capt. Frank Huger's battery, gallantly participated in the fight, holding their ground under a murderous fire, and then pushed back a largely superior force of the enemy.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
on, Lieut.-Col. A. S. Cutts, (A) Ross' battery, (B) Patterson's battery, (C) Wingfield's battery; Fraser's battery (Pulaski artillery) and Carlton's battery (Troup artillery), of Col. H. C. Cabell's battalion; and Milledge's battery of Col. William Nelson's battalion. Wingfield's and Milledge's batteries were in reserve and not actively engaged. The others were in the thickest of the fight. Capt. John Lane's battery (E), of the Sumter battalion, was at this time on detached service in North Carolina. As this history chiefly concerns the part taken by Georgians, we will not detail here the general circumstances of this famous battle—the crossing of the Rappahannock river near Chancellorsville by the United States army under Hooker, the brilliant flank movement of Jackson's corps, the rout of Howard's corps, the fatal wounding of Jackson after dark by his own men, the successful attack on Sunday under J. E. B. Stuart, the tenacious defense of Fredericksburg and the total defeat of
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 14: (search)
00,but 18,000 men offered themselves for this service. The command of this force was conferred upon Howell Cobb, promoted to major-general with headquarters at Atlanta, and under him were Brig.-Gens. Alfred Iverson, Jr., with headquarters at Rome, and Henry R. Jackson at Savannah. Maj.-Gen. Gustavus W. Smith, who had resigned from the Confederate army, entered the service of the State with especial charge, at this time, of fortifications. At the close of the year 1863, according to the statement published by authority of the government at Richmond, Georgia had lost a greater number of soldiers than any other State of the Confederacy. The list as published is: Georgia, 9,504; Alabama, 8,987; North Carolina, 8,361; Texas, 6,377; Virginia, 5,943; Mississippi, 6,367; South Carolina, 4,511; Louisiana, 3,039; Tennessee, 2,849; Arkansas, 1,948; Florida, 1,119. During the fall of this year the fortification of Atlanta was begun, under the direction of Col. M. H. Wright, commanding.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
arolina brigade, and C. H. Stevens' Georgia brigade. Maj.-Gen. William B. Bate's division, composed of Lewis' Kentucky brigade, Bate's (Tyler's) Georgia and Tennessee brigade, and Finley's Florida brigade. Hood's corps: Maj.-Gen. T. C. Hindman's division, including Deas' Alabama brigade, Tucker's Mississippi brigade, Manigault's Alabama and South Carolina brigade, and Walthall's Mississippi brigade. Maj.-Gen. C. L. Stevenson's division, composed of Brown's Tennessee brigade, Reynolds' North Carolina and Virginia brigade, Alfred Cumming's Georgia brigade, and Pettus' Alabama brigade. Maj.-Gen. Stewart's division, composed of Stovall's Georgia brigade, Gibson's Louisiana brigade, Clayton's Alabama brigade, and Baker's Alabama brigade. Wheeler's cavalry corps: Maj.-Gen. W. H. Martin's division, including the Alabama brigade of Gen. J. T. Morgan and the Georgia brigade of Gen. Alfred Iverson; Brig.-Gen. J. H. Kelly's division, composed of the Confederate brigade of Gen. W. W. Allen
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
he Confederate service, but a single regiment, the Georgia regulars, of about 300 effective men, was permitted to be upon her soil during the march of General Sherman from her northeast border to the city of Savannah, and that gallant regiment was kept upon one of our islands most of the time and not permitted to unite with those who met the enemy. Nor were the places of our absent sons filled by troops from other States. One brigade of Confederate troops was sent by the President from North Carolina, which reached Georgia after her capital was in possession of the enemy. For eight months the Confederate reserves, reserve militia, detailed men, exempts, and most State officers, civil as well as military, had kept the field almost constantly, participating in every important fight from Kenesaw to Honey Hill. If the sons of Georgia under arms in other States had been permitted to meet the foe upon her own soil, without other assistance, General Sherman's army could never have passed
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
officers and men were paroled in the Georgia brigades: In Anderson's 987, Benning's 809, DuBose's 347, Simms' 190, Cook's 350, Evans' 841, Sorrel's 1,033, Thomas' 513, a total of 5,070 out of the 22,349 paroled infantry of the army, or nearly one-fourth. Early in February, General Sherman began his march northward from Savannah. He moved in two columns, one threatening Augusta and the other Charleston. On the day that he entered Columbia, Hardee evacuated Charleston, retiring toward North Carolina. On February 22d, Gen. Joseph E. Johnston was again called upon to take command of the army of Tennessee, transferred to the Carolinas, Hardee's command, Hoke's division, Hampton's cavalry, and such other forces as could be gathered to resist the advance of Sherman, who was reinforced by Schofield's corps at Wilmington. In the organization of the army under Johnston (as reported after April 9th), the following Georgia commands were included: In Brig.-Gen. James A. Smith's briga
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
the army of Tennessee to the surrender near Durham's Station in North Carolina, April 26, 1865. At the close of the war General Anderson retuongressman from 1807 to 181 2. His father was John A. Cobb, of North Carolina, who married Sarah Rootes, of Virginia, and moving to Georgia, rpsburg, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, and was sent into North Carolina under the orders of Gen. D. H. Hill. When the Federal forces ber. At the last, when General Johnston reorganized his army in North Carolina, and consolidated Cumming's brigade with two others, General Cu Virginia in 1861, and for the greater part of that year was in North Carolina. When Colonel Wright became brigadier-general, he appointed Gi Bentonville, and were surrendered with the rest of the army in North Carolina, April 26, 1865. After the war General Stovall returned to Aug Eighteenth Georgia. During part of 1861 and 1862 he served in North Carolina. In the spring of 1862 he was with his regiment in the various