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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 163 47 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 151 13 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 128 0 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 62 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 57 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 55 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 53 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 49 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment 40 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 37 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Jacksonville (Florida, United States) or search for Jacksonville (Florida, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: strategic Reconnoissances. (search)
ated throughout the night, and conjectured rightly that the Confederates were burning saw-mills and other buildings at Jacksonville. At daylight they were under way and at noon at anchor off Jacksonville. The troops were landed without delay and thJacksonville. The troops were landed without delay and the outskirts of the town picketed. Two pieces of heavy ordnance, that the enemy had in transit, were found on the wharf, but time had failed him to carry them farther. The Ottawa proceeded eighty miles up the St. John's to Orange Mills, as far as the draught of the former would permit, and the Ellen passed some miles beyond; they then returned to Jacksonville. In a few days the Darlington, the small steamer captured at Fernandina, was repaired, put in service, and on the 17th was off JacksoJacksonville. Lieutenant-Commander Stevens employed her in the recovery of the famous yacht America, that had been used in blockaderun-ning and on the arrival of the National forces had been sunk in a creek. The gunboats thereafter patrolled the naviga
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: operations against Charleston. (search)
the St. John's River, Florida, and desired a naval co-operation. This was at once given, the Mahaska, Dai Ching and Water Witch leaving forthwith. The force off Charleston was left in command of Commodore Rowan, and the admiral proceeded to Jacksonville. The National troops had landed at that point, and a considerable force gone into the interior. The admiral returned to Charleston, leaving the Mahaska, Ottawa, and Nor. which to second army operations. The Confederates, notwithstanding f danger, but the boat was not seen by any of them. The enemy not only used torpedo-boats with some success, but in the adjacent waters fixed torpedoes, which exploded on contact. By this means, in the St. John's River, fifteen miles above Jacksonville, on the 1st of April, the army transport Maple Leaf was sunk; and on the 10th of May, below the city, the transport Weed, and a third one later on. The navy steamer Harvest Moon, nearly one year later, was sunk in the same manner below Georget
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: reduction of Newbern—the Albemarle. (search)
and. The vessel was sunk near the entrance of the canal, and some fifty yards in length was filled in with trunks of trees, stumps, and brushwood. On his return he assisted Colonel Hawkins in destroying Confederate, commissary star stores on the Chowan, which was effected on the 7th of May. Lieutenant William B. Cushing had been given command of the steamer Ellis and was employed in blockading New River Inlet, which he entered on the 23d of November, 1862, with the object of going to Jacksonville, destroying any salt works found, and capturing such vessels as he might find. Five miles up he sighted a vessel with a cargo of cotton and turpentine, which was on the and abandoned by the enemy. At 1 P. M. he reached the town, thirty-five miles from the mouth of the river, where twenty-five stand of arms, a large mail, and two schooners were captured. At 2.30 P. M. the Ellis started down the river; at five an encampment was seen near the banks and thoroughly shelled. At the point wh
t seq. Houston, George, a Regulator, 68 et seq. Huzzar, the, 179 I. Indiana, regiments of: Twentieth, 173 Ingraham, Commodore D. N., proclamation of, concerning blockade at Charleston, 78 et seq., 82 I. N. Seymour, the, 177 Iosco, the, 218 Iris, the, 156 Iroquois, the, U. S. vessel, 7 Irwin, Lieutenant, 43; commended, 62 Isaac Smith, the, U. S. vessel, 17, 19, 21, 26, 37, 46, 49 et seq., 52, 72 et seq., 130 Ives, Captain T. P., 179 J. Jacksonville, Fla., 60 et seq. James Adger, the, 84 Jeffers, Lieutenant-Commanding William N., 177, 186 John Adams, the, U. S. sloop, 7 Johnson, Ensign M. L., conduct commended, 62; again commended, 102 Johnson, Neils, 69 Jones, Ensign, 200, 211 Jordan, Thomas, 78 Josselyn, of the Commodore Hull, 210 Judah, the, Confederate privateer, 69 Juniata, the, 156, 222, 228 K. Kansas, the, 210, 228 Kempff, Acting Master, 43 Keokuk, the, 90 et seq., 99 et seq., 116