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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 61 1 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 41 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 37 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 31 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 25 1 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 13 3 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 12 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for John McNeil or search for John McNeil in all documents.

Your search returned 21 results in 4 document sections:

rtermaster stores. Marmaduke learned that Gen, John McNeil, of infamous memory, was at Bloomfield with abouttate the Missouri troops would rather have captured McNeil. Marmaduke sent a strong force to drive him towardicktown on time, but there was no sign nor sound of McNeil or Carter. He waited a day, and then moved his com of Carter. At the end of two days he learned that McNeil had gone to Cape Girardeau and that Carter, becoming excited in the chase, had followed him, and that McNeil was inside the fortifications with a largely increasd by Shelby attacking the fortifications and giving McNeil all he could do to defend himself. In the attack Sand a larger force than his own close on his rear. McNeil was ordered, as soon as Carter was rescued, to throom the north. It would not have been difficult for McNeil to do this. He would have had the shorter road anposed, and get the whole pursuing force behind him. McNeil's conduct gave rise to a newspaper controversy shor
rce as strong as his own, but charged it out of hand and made short work of it. McNeil was in command of the Federal forces at Springfield, and it was perhaps fortunate for Shelby and Shanks that he was. McNeil was not a fighter. As far as he ever went in that way was to make a demonstration—a show of fight—to save his reputationning he returned and reported that he had been driven out of the town, and that McNeil with a large force was in possession of it. Shelby was not anxious to meet McNeMcNeil, because his ammunition was reduced to ten rounds to the man, and he might have to fight to get across the Arkansas. He knew McNeil well enough to be satisfied tMcNeil well enough to be satisfied that he had nothing to fear from him. So he continued to retire and McNeil continued to follow him, but keeping at least a mile in rear. Once he made a mistake and goMcNeil continued to follow him, but keeping at least a mile in rear. Once he made a mistake and got too close, when Gordon drove him back with his single regiment. Nor did he attempt to interfere when Shelby crossed the Arkansas river and continued his march leis
s captains, and a noted guerrilla fighter, who was up with the advance guard, was shot through the neck and died in a few minutes. The guerrilla warfare in Missouri was more bitter and merciless than in any other State; but as far as Southern men who took part in it were concerned it was strictly a war of retaliation. In September, 1861, Jim Lane with a body of Kansas jayhawkers took and wantonly burned the town of Osceola in St. Clair county. Later in the fall of that year the butcher, McNeil, had ten prisoners, many of them non-combatants, shot because one Andrew Allsman, of whom they knew nothing, had disappeared from his home and could not be found. In November, 1861, Col. C. B. Jennison, of the First Kansas cavalry, issued a proclamation to the people of the border counties of Missouri, in which he said: All who shall disregard these propositions (to surrender their arms and sign deeds of forfeiture of their property) shall be treated as traitors and slain wherever found. T
ain out. The bottom of the Big Blue was low on the north side and hilly on the south side. Gen. John McNeil was sent with a heavy force to take possession of the hills and prevent the crossing of the stream. McNeil was in no hurry to obey his orders. When his column made its appearance on the prairie, a couple of miles to the south and east of the crossing, Marmaduke was hotly engaged with Rosecrans, but he was ordered to send Clark's brigade at speed to anticipate McNeil and hold the heights. When Clark got there McNeil, instead of taking possession of the heights, had opened upon, them wMcNeil, instead of taking possession of the heights, had opened upon, them with .his artillery, half a mile away, and was shelling the woods in a lively manner. Cabell's brigade soon joined Clark's and an avenue for the train and the army was secured. McNeil did not attemptMcNeil did not attempt to interfere with the train as the wagons ascended the hill from the bottom and appeared on the open prairie. In the meantime Rosecrans was pushing Marmaduke's depleted command before him, and She