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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 666 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 174 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 124 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 74 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 48 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 46 22 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 42 0 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 40 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 32 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Kenesaw (Nebraska, United States) or search for Kenesaw (Nebraska, United States) in all documents.

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ded it, which made a more determined assault, advanced farther and stood its ground longer than they had, but in the end shared the same fate—was driven back and hurled in confusion down the side of the mountain. In threequar-ters of an hour the attack was ended and the enemy gone, leaving his dead in piles on the side and at the bottom of the hill. Bledsoe's and Guibor's batteries rendered efficient services in repelling these assaults. On the 3d of July General Johnston withdrew from Kenesaw and established a new line on Peach Tree creek and the river below its mouth. He had been successful in all the battles he had fought during the campaign. In addition, General Forrest had achieved a brilliant victory over General Sturgis in northern Mississippi. At this juncture General Johnston was relieved of the command by order of the President, and Gen. John B. Hood assigned to it. Subsequently, the first engagement in which the brigade took part was an attack by a portion of Hardee