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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 282 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 121 3 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 107 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 87 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 68 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 62 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 40 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 37 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 36 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Robert E. Rodes or search for Robert E. Rodes in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 2 document sections:

al Lee his admiration and special thanks. The next commander of this regiment was Christopher C. Pegues, who, like General Rodes, also reached great distinction, and after winning the encomiums of his commander for his gallantry in many battles, r Fairfax Court House. (440-446) Mentioned in report of Gen. G. T. Beauregard, Manassas: With its excellent officer, Colonel Rodes, it made a resolute protracted defense against heavy odds. On the morning of the 17th, when the enemy appeared beforlan of action and battle. (447) Beauregard's special orders regarding position of regiment, July 8, 1861. (459-461) Colonel Rodes' report of the affair of Fairfax Court House, Va., says: Captain Shelley's company having been sent out skirmishing,un, by E. J. Allen (Allen Pinkerton), January 27, 1862. (825) Ewell's brigade, Beauregard's corps, August, 1861. (1029) Rodes' brigade, Beauregard's Potomac District, January 14, 1862. Vol. XI, Part 1—(621) Mentioned in report of Capt. W
He led this regiment at Yorktown, Williamsburg, Seven Pines and the battles around Richmond. At Seven Pines he had a horse killed under him, and was himself severely injured by a fragment of shell. During the advance into Maryland he commanded Rodes' brigade until two days before the battle of Boonsboro, when he was relieved and returned to the command of his regiment. In this battle he received a very painful wound in the thigh. During the winter he again reported for duty and took command of the brigade. He led the brigade at Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Mine Run, General Rodes having been put in command of the division. Early in 1864 his regiment was sent back to Alabama to recruit, but was not permitted to long remain idle, being ordered to Dalton and placed in Cantey's brigade. General Cantey being now in charge of the division, Colonel O'Neal led his brigade through the battles and marches of the Atlanta campaign until after the removal of General Johnston. Soon af