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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 149 3 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 125 9 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 92 6 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 88 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 83 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 70 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 53 5 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 51 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 41 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for William Nelson or search for William Nelson in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 3 document sections:

. J. M. Crews, of Crews' battalion, Colonel Trabue reported that he behaved well. The battalion lost 55 in killed and wounded. Forrest's regiment of cavalry added renown to the reputation made at Fort Donelson. He was in advance of Breckinridge as he moved out of Corinth, covered the flank of our army with the greatest intelligence and courage, and participated in the movement which forced from Prentiss all support on his left. On the morning of the 7th he gave notice of the advance of Nelson's division, made a dash at his skirmish line, captured 50 prisoners, and held the enemy in check until ordered by General Hardee to retire. Colonel Forrest was with Breckinridge in covering the Confederate retreat to Corinth, and in a combat with the Federal advance was severely wounded. After the abandonment of the capital of Tennessee, Gov. Isham G. Harris determined to promote the cause of the South at any sacrifice. No effort was left untried to induce continued enlistments in the a
decisive victories of the war. The Federal troops were commanded by Brig.-Gen. M. D. Manson until 2 p. m., when Maj.-Gen. William Nelson reached the field and took command. According to General Manson, the Union troops did not exceed 6,500, and Genhat he had encountered 10,000 men, and Manson was confident that he was beaten by an army of veterans 16,000 strong. General Nelson reported, under date of 31st of August, that he arrived on the field three miles south of Richmond, at 2 p. m., and ops stood about three rounds when, struck by a panic, they fled in disorder. I was left with my staff almost alone. General Nelson was wounded in this combat and General Manson captured. The return of casualties in the United States forces shows t Preston Smith's division announced its presence on the field. Manson fell back two miles, and then it was that Major-General Nelson assumed command of the Federal forces. He formed his line of defense in front of Richmond. The gallant Churchill
ried to Nashville for its defense, others were sent to Readyville, Statesville, Wilton, and to a point on the old Franklin road, others toward Lebanon, all charged with the same duty—to cut Forrest off. Under date of July 24th, the famous Gen. William Nelson, then at Murfreesboro, informed General Buell that he had ordered a battalion of Wolford's cavalry and a battalion of Beard's to join him. When they do come I will have about 1,200 cavalry, and Mr. Forrest shall have no rest. I will hunt him myself. Fortunately for General Nelson, he never found him. Forrest rested a few days at McMinnville, then left there on the 18th with 700 effective troops and moved on Lebanon, Tenn., which he occupied unmolested for two days, the Federal forces having hastily retired. On the 21st he moved to within a few miles of Nashville, destroyed the railroad bridges across Mill creek, skirmished with the garrison at Antioch, captured 97 prisoners, frightened the garrison at Nashville and retired