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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 654 2 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 393 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 58 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 44 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 44 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 40 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 28 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 26 2 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 22 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 19 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book. You can also browse the collection for George Ticknor or search for George Ticknor in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, II (search)
American temperament the recent assertion of the London correspondent of the New York Tribune, that Englishmen like every American to be an American, has a curious interest in connection with some remarks of the late Matthew Arnold, which seem to look in an opposite direction. Lord Houghton once told me that the earlier American guests in London society were often censured as being too English in appearance and manner, and as wanting in a distinctive flavor of Americanism. He instanced Ticknor and Sumner; and we can all remember that there were at first similar criticisms on Lowell. It is indeed a form of comment to which all Americans are subject in England, if they have the ill-luck to have color in their cheeks and not to speak very much through their noses; in that case they are apt to pass for Englishmen by no wish of their own, and to be suspected of a little double dealing when they hasten to reveal their birthplace. It very often turns out that the demand for a distinc
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, Index (search)
, A. C., 68,158. T. Taine, H. A., 53. Taking ourselves seriously, on, 35. Talleyrand, C. M., 193. Tasso, Torquato, 187, 217. Taylor, Bayard, 67, 100. Taylor, Sir, Henry, 78, 167. Taylor, Thomas, 215. Temperament, an American, 2. Tennyson, Lord, 25, 29, 53, 56, 94, 95, 98, 124, 126, 184, 196, 203, 205. Test of the dime novel, the, 198. Thackeray, W. M., 93, 111. Thomas, Isaiah, 42. Thompson, Maurice, 67. Thoreau, H. D., VI., 9, 16, 73, 90, 114, 155, 175, 220. Ticknor, George, 19. Tocqueville, A. C. H. de, 32, 121. Tolstoi, Count, Leo, 35. Tonics, literary, 62. Touchstone quoted, 21. Tourgueneff, Ivan, 219. Town and gown, 161. Tracy, Uriah, 46. Transcendental school, the, 8. Translators, American, 144. Travers, W. R., 82. Trench, R. C., 57. Trollope, Frances, 24. Tupper, M. F., 98. Twain, Mark, see Clemens. Tyndall, John, 22. U, V. Urquhart, David, 208, 209. Vestris, M., 83. Virgil, 99, 171, 217. Voltaire, F. M. A. de,