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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 296 296 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 15 15 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 12 12 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 11 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 11 11 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 8 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for October, 1864 AD or search for October, 1864 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of cavalry operations. (search)
mmediate supervision. My task is fraught with difficulties, and if its execution is defective I hope, in the interest of history, it will be corrected by those whose memories serve them better than my own. To attempt more than a general outline would be beyond my limit. Brigadier-General W. C. Wickham, my immediate predecessor, was elected to the Confederate Congress in the spring of 1863, and soon thereafter was promoted as Brigadier-General of cavalry. He held both commissions until October, 1864, when he resigned his military commission. It happened that in nearly every important engagement, if he was present, he commanded the division and I his brigade. Whenever we co-operated with other cavalry brigades in the Valley of Virginia, General Fitz Lee being the senior Major General, he would take command of the whole, Wickham of the division and I of the brigade. General Fitz Lee having been seriously wounded at the battle of Winchester, 19th September, I had command of Wickham'
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Artillery at the Southern arsenals. (search)
ld artillery at any of the Southern arsenals. At the Fayetteville, N. C., arsenal, there was a fine battery of brass field pieces—four six-pounder guns, and two twelve-pounder howitzers, with forge and battery wagon complete. When the arsenal was surrendered to the State forces, this battery was turned over to the Ellis Light Artillery Company, of Raleigh, first commanded by Captain S. D. Ramseur, who, as Major-General commanding division, was killed at Cedar Creek, in the Valley, in October, 1864. The battery first saw service near Norfolk and on the Peninsula, and was subsequently known as Manly's Battery (Captain B. C. Manly), of Cabell's Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia. In time the company no doubt fell heir to twelve-pounder Napoleons, or to rifled pieces, but guns of that kind were not much known in the early days of 1861, and a company provided with a complete battery of guns of almost any calibre, with necessary appurtenances, was then thought to be very well equi