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Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 103 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 90 2 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 67 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 65 1 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 35 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 26 2 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 23 1 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 19 1 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 14 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Frank Blair or search for Frank Blair in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of campaign against Grant in North Mississippi in 1862-63. (search)
his centre; they were on more elevated ground. Their front was, in great part, securely covered by deep and impassable fissures or gullies, which the enemy could not discover until within point-blank range, and their fire could sweep the whole front of attack. About four o'clock P. M., the enemy, in a heavy column, marched out of the timber beyond the bayou, crossed the narrow neck between the bayous, and marched straight against Lee's centre. The column of attack was commanded by General Frank Blair, and moved up in fine and formidable array; but so deadly was the fire of Lee's line, and so steady were his men, that before the foremost enemy could come within one hundred yards, their lines were broken, the attack was repulsed, the Federals were retreating in disorder to the cover of the woods, leaving one thousand dead, wounded and prisoners on the field, and General Sherman was defeated, and from that moment abandoned all further efforts at an attack, and turned all his energies