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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 36 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 32 4 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 20 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 18 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 14 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Macaulay or search for Macaulay in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Heroes of the old Camden District, South Carolina, 1776-1861. an Address to the Survivors of Fairfield county, delivered at Winnsboro, S. C., September 1,1888. (search)
, is one of the most obscure problems in the philosophy of history. But the fact is certain. Will some future historian ponder how it chanced that the people of the South, conquered by the numbers and resources of the North; a people whose very soil had been in a great measure confiscated by alien adventurers, thieves and outcasts left in the wake of Sherman's plundering march; a people who had been given over to a tyranny of caste infinitely greater and more galling than that of which Macaulay wrote, because it was the tyranny of the inferior caste over the superior; became the restorers and guardians of civil liberty, the admiration of other people? We may not yet say that however difficult it is of explanation, the fact is certain. But we can truly say that the Southern people are wisely and patiently and courageously dealing with problems as great, if not greater, than those solved by the English Commons under Hampden. Your victorious ancestors, my comrades, proved themse
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Old South. (search)
e is another interesting aspect of the numerical statistics. The seceded States are supposed to have had, from first to last, 700,000 men in the field, and you must admit that this is a very large number out of a population of five millions. Macaulay, in his essay on Frederick the Great, says: The proportion which the soldiers in Prussia bore to the population seems hardly credible. Of the males in the vigor of life, a seventh part were probably under arms. Doubtless, Macaulay would have tMacaulay would have thought it not at all credible that the South put into the field, not one-seventh of the males in the vigor of life, but one-seventh of the entire white population, including men, women, and children. General Grant expressed tersely the draft made upon the male whites of the South, when he said: The Confederacy robbed the cradle and the grave to recruit its armies. It is plain that 700,000 soldiers is a high estimate for the Confederate forces from first to last. The other belligerent had in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
y, Col., 303. Loring, Alonzo, 83. Loring, Gen. W. W.,89, 90. Lost Cause Vindicated, The, 232. Louisiana Troops, 448, 450. Lowery, Gen. M. P., Autobiography of, 365. Lloyd, Capt. E. W., 134, 183. Lucas, Maj. J. J., 177 Lucas, Maj. J. L., 120. Lyles, Capt. T. H., 20. Lyles, Capt W. B., 17. Lynch, Capt. J. P., 59, 60, 61, 62, 65; Battery of, 58; captured, 64, 66. Lynch, Commodore W. F., 439. Lynch's Creek, Battle of, 26. Maccabeus, Judas, 199. McCampbell. Lt. John, 59 Macaulay's Hampden, cited, 33. McCarthy, Capt., Carlton, 296. McCaule, Rev. Thos H., 13. McChesney, Capt., 88. McLain, Dr., 363. McClellan, Gen. Geo., 30, 31, 89, 256; forces of, 1862, 256, 317. McClernand, Gen., 71, 80. McClung, Capt., 58; Battery of, 61, 66. McClure, Maj. E. C., 15, 16. McClure, Capt., John, 7, 8; killed, 10. McComb, Gen., Wm., Staff of, 107. McCorkle, Major, 20. McCormick, Cyrus H., 428. McCown, Gen. J. P., 70,95. McCrady, Jr., Col. Edw., Address of, 3,