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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The siege and evacuation of Savannah, Georgia, in December, 1864. (search)
erless to arrest the devastating march of General Sherman's columns through the heart of Georgia; along the water front. In anticipation of General Sherman's arrival on the coast, the Federal war vn recognition of the fact that so soon as General Sherman's army should have fully enveloped the weg a display of resistance as practicable, General Sherman, even at that late day, might be induced unused to action—it seems marvellous that General Sherman should have contented himself with sittinnd the want of military skill betrayed by General Sherman, with the formidable force at his commandverpowered. Upon the fall of this work General Sherman acquired full control of the Great Ogeechration elsewhere. A conference between Generals Sherman and Foster and Admiral Dahlgren resulted dismounted cavalry. The following day General Sherman demanded the surrender of Savannah and itof Savannah was confidently anticipated. General Sherman had left orders that the assault should n[5 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual Reunion of the Association of the Army of Northern Virginia. (search)
Mississippi was opened by the fall of Vicksburg. Another line had now been drawn across it, marked with blood and grave-mounds, from the Tennessee to Atlanta, and by blackened ruins and desolated homes from Atlanta to the sea. Hood's ill-starred expedition into Tennessee had ended in disaster. The fair valley of the Shenandoah had been ravaged until, in the graphic but unclassic language of the Federal commander there, a crow in flying across it would have to carry his rations with him. Sherman was advancing through the heart of the Carolinas, marking his track by the blaze of burning cities and homes. And so disasters came not singly; But as if they watched and waited, Scanning one another's motions, When the first descended, others Followed, followed gathering flock-wise Round their wounded, dying victim, First a shadow, then a sorrow, Till the air was dark with anguish. The world was against us. We were treading the wine press alone. The women of the Confederacy.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Life, services and character of Jefferson Davis. (search)
anges which liberates all prisoners taken, we will have to fight on until the whole South is exterminated. If we hold those caught they amount to no more than dead men. At this particular time, to release all rebel prisoners North, would insure Sherman's defeat and would compromise our own safety here. Alexander H. Stephens declared that the effort to fix odium on President Davis constituted one of the boldest and baldest attempted outrages upon the truth of history which has ever been essa and of course declined. Even had compensation for slaves been proposed, the Confederate soldiers would have repudiated such terms as conditions of surrender. True, they were in dire distress. With scarce a handful, Johnston could only harass Sherman in the South, and the men of Lee could see from their trenches the mighty swarms marshalling in their front. The starvation that clutched at their throats plunged its dagger to their hearts as they thought of loved ones famishing at home. But
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Prisoners of the civil war. (search)
r refusal to exchange. General Grant assumed it, saying in his letter of August 18, 1864: It is hard on our men in Southern prisons not to exchange them, but is humanity to those left in the ranks to fight our battles. If we commence a system of exchanges which liberates all prisoners taken, we will have to fight on until the whole South is exterminated. If we hold those caught they amount to no more than dead men. At this particular time to release all rebel prisoners North would insure Sherman's defeat and would compromise our own safety here. Alexander H. Stephens declared that the effort to fix odium on President Davis constituted one of the boldest and baldest attempted outrages upon the truth of history which has ever been essayed. Charles A. Dana, of the New York Sun, formerly Assistant Secretary of War, nobly vindicated President Davis while he lived, declared him altogether acquitted of the charge, and said of him dead: A majestic soul has passed. When General Lee
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Andersonville prison. (search)
risons not to exchange them, but it is humanity to those left in the ranks to fight our battles. Every man released on parole or otherwise, becomes an active soldier against us at once, either directly or indirectly. If we commence a system of exchange which liberates all prisoners taken, we will have to fight on until the whole South is exterminated. If we hold those caught they amount to no more than dead men. At this particular time to release all rebel prisoners North would insure Sherman's defeat and would compromise our safety here. This policy, continued the Doctor, not only kept our men out of the field, but threw upon our impoverished commissariat the feeding of a large number of prisoners. Treatment of prisoners. In refutation of the charge that prisoners were starved, let it be noted that the Confederate Congress in May, 1861, passed a bill providing that the rations furnished to prisoners of war should be the same in quantity and quality as those issued t