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Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 154 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 33 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 24 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 22 2 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 12 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 6 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 6 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Munich (Bavaria, Germany) or search for Munich (Bavaria, Germany) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
he city. It was a mass of both sexes, representing every age and condition. Woman was probably in the majority—grand-mother, mother, maiden, children by the hand, infant in the arms—all with flushed cheeks and warm eyes. The crowd had begun to assemble before 3 o'clock, by 4:30 o'clock it was a mass more than a half a mile in extent. The street was packed, windows and balconies were thronged, housetops were covered. Washington and Lee. When Washington's statue arrived here from Munich, in 1858, it was placed upon a great wagon to which a large number of horses and mules were attached. They, however, didn't pull together. Hence the progress was poor. At times they threatened to come to a full stop. It was then, responding to the popular enthusiasm and demand, that the draught-animals were taken away and ropes affixed to the vehicle, and with men and boys to man them the colossal statue (all of it except the tail in one piece) was easily, gracefully, and expeditious