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Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 229 3 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 158 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 138 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 107 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 104 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 65 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 59 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 52 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 45 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 20 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for William B. Franklin or search for William B. Franklin in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
nia volunteers (infantry). Blues' Band. Richmond Light Infantry Blues, Captain Sol. Cutchins. Colonel J. V. Bidgood, of the First regiment Virginia cavalry, and staff. Chesterfield Troop, Captain David Moore. Hanover Troop, Captain P. H. Hall. Stuart Horse Guards, Captain Charles Euker. There was some delay in the movement of the Howitzers, who were ten or fifteen minutes behind the balance of the column as it passed down Broad street to Nineteenth, to Main, to Fifth to Franklin. The Veterans fall in. Here the Veteran corps, under command of Major Thomas A. Brander, fell in ahead of the cavalry. This division consisted of Lee Camp, No. 1, Confederate Veterans, Commander A. W. Archer; Pickett Camp, Confederate Veterans, Commander Jennings, and Sons of Confederate Veterans, Captain W. Deane Courtney. The march was then resumed up Franklin street to the Lee monument, where the line arrived a little before 4 o'clock. At General Lee's monument. The cer
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 5 (search)
58, when a board of cavalry officers was assembled in Washington to establish a uniform equipage for our cavalry and artillery regiments. We were occupied several weeks on this business in Winder's building, where during the same time Captain William B. Franklin and Raphel Semmes were serving together on the light-house board. One day after our daily session Franklin said: Now that you have seen Lee and Johnston working together for some weeks, how do you estimate the two men? In previous Franklin said: Now that you have seen Lee and Johnston working together for some weeks, how do you estimate the two men? In previous discussion I had thought Lee more full of promise and capacity. I said: While both are as earnest and intelligent as possible, I have noticed that Colonel Lee often yields his opinions to those of the board or of other members of it, while Colonel Johnston has never on any occasion yielded his, but frequently has made the board yield to him. In fact, he is the one man who seems to have come to his work with a clear and fixed idea of what is needed in every detail of it. Cordial intercourse
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memorial services in Memphis Tenn., March 31, 1891. (search)
His anxious efforts to keep his army supplied with all the necessary material, his care for the lives and safety of his men, superadded to his great generalship, elicited the loyalty and devotion of his army to a degree that was only equaled by that of the army of Northern Virginia to the invincible and immortal Lee. As an instance of the confidence and devotion of his army, after he had left it and after it had been beaten, battered and broken by the battles around Atlanta, Jonesboroa, Franklin and Nashville, and he had been recalled by the voice of the country to its command in North Carolina, and the men heard that he was coming and was then in the vicinity of the army, many of them left their camps, guns, equipage, everything, and set out to find him, and when they did so they embraced him with shouts of joy and tears of affection; and the old hero was so deeply affected by their demonstrations of devotion that his strong frame trembled with emotion, as it had never done in the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 9 (search)
. Even distinguished participants in such strifes are not slow to yield to importunity, autobigraphic memoirs of colossal achievements scarcely recognizable by their friends, the effects of which are misleading. In the late war, and by the chroniclers of that war, we were denounced as rebels and traitors, as if the promoters of such epithets were ignorant of the fact that in our Revolutionary war Hancock, Adams and their compeers were denounced as rebels and traitors, while Washington and Franklin threw up their commissions to join this despised class. Indeed, the very chimney-sweeps in the streets of London are said to have spoken of our rebellious ancestors, as their subjects in America. Therefore, with a conscience void of offence, while we would not and should not forget our hallowed memories of comradeship and of common suffering, we cherish them alone as memories, and seek no willows upon which to hang our harps, no rivers by which to sit down and weep, while we sing the song
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General P. R. Cleburne. Dedication of a monument to his memory at Helena, Arkansas, May 10th, 1891. (search)
under fire to press bravely forward and never turn back, he said in effect: I will accomplish what I next undertake or else I will perish in making the attempt. Franklin was his next battle; it was also his last. Thus perished the Stonewall of the West, as he was often called. A truer patriot or knightlier soldier never fought bed of shamrock; the Confederate seal, showing Washington on warhorse, wreathed in Southland's blooms and products; the sunburst of Ireland over the inscription Franklin, symbolizing that his life passed thence in an effulgence of glory. All the honors we can do him cannot equal his deserts. This beautiful monument, which love en the scene was dim; But on the inner works the death hail Rang in dying Cleburne's ears a battle hymn. On the east side was the the sunburst and the legend, Franklin. On the side facing the south was the harp of Erin entwined with the shamrock, below which was the stanza: Memory ne'er will cease to cherish deeds of glor