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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 55 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 42 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 19 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 1 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Charles E. Hooker or search for Charles E. Hooker in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
ng strains during the day of combat and conflict of Confederate and Federal, and there were cheers and good nature for everybody. If it is given to the spirits of great commanders to sit at the banquet board with the followers and admirers still in the flesh, General Robert E. Lee must have kissed the phantom-blade in salutation to the noble men whom he often led. The first table. The gentlemen at the first table were General Bradley T. Johnson (presiding), General Wade Hampton, General Hooker (congressman from Mississippi), Captain Booth, Major W. H. Wigfall, Major Skip--with Wilmer, Colonel Spencer Jones, Rev. William M. Dame, Captain A. J. Smith, General J. L. Brent, Colonel Henry Kyd Douglas, Major R. M. Blundon, Captain L. N. Hope and Winfield Peters. The New York Veterans. Their first annual dinner. The Confederate Veterans' Camp of New York gave its first annual dinner this evening in the great dining-room of the New York Hotel. The hall was tastefully decorated
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 17 (search)
dge the consoling invitation: Well done, good and faithful servant, enter into the joy of your Lord. Amen. Then Hon. C. E. Hooker, in behalf of the Ladies' Monument Association of Mississippi, made a brief but most impressive and able address ination. There were only nine ladies present at the first meeting. Mrs. Sallie B. Morgan presided at this meeting. Mrs. C. E. Hooker was elected president; Mrs. Brunson, vice-president; Miss Andrews, treasurer; Miss Fontaine, secretary; and Mrs. Maed to grow, and was chartered under the laws of the State on March 17, 1887. An executive committee, consisting of Mrs. C. E. Hooker, Mrs. W. W. Stone, Mrs. Nugent, and Mrs. Dunning, was appointed, and under their legal charter, new officers, with Miss Winnie Davis, Daughter of the Confederacy, was present and added much to the enthusiasm of the occasion. General Charles E. Hooker was the orator of the day. The Legislature of 1890 reversed the action of the Legislature of 1888, and a bil
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Monument to the Confederate dead at Fredericksburg, Virginia, unveiled June 10, 1891. (search)
outh. They are right, because they themselves developed and made necessary the qualities in the South which are accomplishing these results. Their war, their reconstruction, their effort to subvert society and put the bottom rail on top, have welded us into a solid mass and aroused energies unknown that will beat them in the struggle for material development and ideas that will govern this Republic as long as it lasts. But we are in greater danger now than we ever were from McClellan or Hooker, Pope or Grant. Material development is progressing with constantly accelerating force. Wealth is accumulating. Booms, plutocracy, worship of money, are all impressing the doctrine that the end justifies the means, and that success is the highest duty, and our danger is that the very civilization of industrialism which we spent so much blood and so many lives to resist may at last overwhelm the institutions of our ancestors and the principles which we have inherited. But I have no fe