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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.19 (search)
ssing. The march from the Valley to Seven Days Around Richmond, and that to Pope's rear at Manassas; the march to the capture of Harper's Ferry, and thence to Sharpsburg (Antietam); the move from the Valley to first Fredericksburg, and that to Hooker's rear at Chancellorsville, were all famous for their rapidity. It is related of Bedford Forest—the Wizard of the Saddle, the Stonewall Jack— son of the West—that when asked the secret of his success, he promptly replied in characteristic, if nat the enemy could not detect his plans, and that in some of his most brilliant and successful movements—such as his march against Fremont, and then against Banks, his march to Seven Days Around Richmond, to Pope's rear at Second Manassas, and to Hooker's flank and rear at Chancellorsville—the element of secrecy entered largely into his success. Jackson was noted for the quickness with which he formed his decisions, and his crisp, epigramatic orders on the field of battle. Thirty years
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.21 (search)
of his steed, rather than to his own guidance. Seen at the head of a column of troops, or giving orders for their disposition on the field, Sherman presented a remarkable figure. Riding along the road he was constantly gazing about him, noting the lay of land passed over, as if internally planning how a battle could be fought there. After his retirement from the army, General Sherman seldom mounted a horse, for he said he was getting too old, and had had enough of such exercise. Major General Hooker was probably the best-looking mounted officer that ever rode at the head of a Federal army. He was a true soldier of the old type, had an easy carriage, a firm seat, and sat in the saddle as straight as an arrow. Sometimes the simile is used, as straight as an Indian, but an Indian never sits on a horse straight, however he may walk. Major-General Kilpatrick might be called a born horseman, for he was never so happy as when in the saddle. Though a perfect horseman in every sense
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Thomas J. Jackson. (search)
ground until Longstreet could get up, and routed Pope at the second battle of Manassas, August 30, 862. The Maryland campaign. Two weeks later, in the beginning of the Maryland campaign, Jackson invested and captured Harper's Ferry with eleven thousand prisoners, many stands of arms, and seventy-two guns, and by a terrible night march reached Sharpsburg on September 16th, and on the next morning commanded the left wing of the Confederate army, repulsing with his thin line the corps of Hooker, Mansfield, and Sumner, which were in succession hurled against him. Later in the day A. P. Hill's division of his corps, which had been left at Harper's Ferry, reached the field and defeated Burnside on the right. At Fredericksburg. At Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862, he commanded the Confederate right wing, and in May, 1863, made his Chancellorsville movement, which resulted in his death. On May 3d he received the wound which rendered amputation of the arm necessary. Pneumonia
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Joseph E. Johnston. (search)
queror. It was at the junction of the Yorktown and Hampton Roads, at about half-past 5 on the morning of the 5th, that Hooker's sharp shooters, leading the pursuit, drove in the Confederate picket. It was in front of Fort Magruder, one of a cordohought had constructed. It was just two miles from the venerable shades and spires of Williamsburg. Within two miles of Hooker, at the time, were thirty thousand troops; within twelve miles the bulk of the Army of the Potomac. He, therefore, made ought field, where Hancock leaped to fame, and where none can be reproached with want of valor. But the army in front of Hooker was neither captured nor held. The well calculated blow of Johnston was fierce and stunning, and his very deliberate retrious results at Second Manassas and Chancellorsville were the consequences of Jackson's spring upon the rear of Pope and Hooker; and not because Jackson suffered himself to be in their predicament. The question presented to Johnston at Rocky Face w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Nineteenth of January. (search)
his old soldiers lessons of peace. With rapid strategic movements after defeating the army of one hundred thousand men under McClellan before Richmond and hurling the boasting Pope and his great army into the defenses around Washington, he moved the besieging army from the beleagured Confederate capitol, and concentrated the enemy's forces to the defense of Washington, and in a few months recovered all Northern Virginia from the occupancy of the foe. When McClellan and Pope and Burnside and Hooker and Meade, each successfully commanding the largest and best equipped army ever gathered on the continent, entering no engagement with less than one hundred thousand men, each in turn tried to crush the noble little army of fifty thousand men, and each had in turn been defeated, then came Grant with the largest army of all. His mind was fully made up to give Lee two men for one until his noble little army, now no longer reinforced, should come to an end. Lee took four men instead of two for
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index (search)
Wm., Distinguished Descendents of, 135. Ray, Rev. George H., Address of, 392. Reams's Station, Battle at, 113. Richmond College, Geographical and Historical Society of, 125. Richmond, Evacuation of, 330; Social Life in, 380. Richmond Fayette Artillery, 57. Richmond Home Guard, 57. Robins, Major W. M., 164. Robinson Leigh, His noble Address on General Joseph E. Johnston: 337. Saddle, General in the, 167; Grant, Lee, Meade, 168; Warren, Burnside, McClellan, Sherman, 169; Hooker. Kilpatrick, Sickles, Hampton, 170; B F. Butler, John Pope, Sheridan, 171; Pleasanton, Hancock, Logan, 172; Stonewall Jackson, Stuart, McClellan, Kearney, 173; Ord, Wallace, Early, Banks, Terry, 174. Scheibert, Major J on Jefferson Davis, 406. Schools, Free in Virginia, 138. Secession of Southern States, Order of the, 412. Sherwood. Grace, Trial of for witchcraft, 131. Slavery in the South, 393; Elements of in Virginia. 135. Smith, J. C., of the Stuart Horse Artillery,