Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Hooker or search for Hooker in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The bloody angle. (search)
oon as I could find time to do so. After much delay I have written what follows, giving the occurrences related as they appeared to the restricted vision of an eyewitness. There was doubtless much that occurred very near me that I did not see, but what I did see is indelibly written on my memory. A little retrospection will not be amiss before speaking of that day's work. It will be remembered that the Army of Northern Virginia, having defeated McDowell, McClellan, Pope, Burnside and Hooker, met its first check at the hands of General Meade, a Virginian, at Gettysburg. The Federal Government then brought General Grant from the West, flushed with victory, to command the largest and best equipped army ever gathered on American soil. Its appointed task was to destroy the army of General Lee and capture the Capital of the Confederate States. To accomplish this cherished object, the new commander was promised all the men, the means and the munitions of war he should ask for.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall's widow. [Mrs. Jefferson Davis in the Ladies' Home journal, Sept. 3, 1893.] (search)
s. The baby was five months old before there was a lull in the fierce strife in which General Jackson was so powerful a motor, which allowed the young wife to take the child to its father, and she, with the infant and a nurse, went to find him in the field. After jolting over miles of new-made road, Mrs. Jackson at length found shelter and the comfort of her husband's companionship, but this indulgence lasted only a little over nine days. The dreaded call to arms was issued to confront General Hooker's advancing army, and the non-combatants were ordered on to Richmond. General Jackson hurried, fasting to the field, after a hasty farewell, expressing the hope that he might find time to return to bid his dear ones loving God-speed, but this privilege was not to be granted. Time passed, and the roar of battle shook to its foundation, and Mrs. Jackson was forced to leave the scenes of her happy reunion, while a procession of litters bearing the wounded was being brought into the yard f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Strategic points. (search)
and the Army of Northern Virginia thus weakened. Hooker had succeeded Burnside in command of the Army of the Potomac. New hopes inspired the Federal army. Hooker was jubilant; he announced to the world the finest ar, with the remainder he moved out to give battle to Hooker. Before developing the Federal battle line, for to guard the fords behind him. Just as he struck Hooker's line, he detached Jackson with about 24,000 men, to place himself upon Hooker's right and rear. Silently and swiftly the old foot cavalry of the Stonewall cg of its evening meal when the storm swept upon it. Hooker's left wing was thrown into utter rout and rushed iBut details are too volumnious. The world knows of Hooker's terrible punishment and defeat. How Lee, with one-third of Hooker's forces, crushed the Federal army and threw it beyond the Rappahannock. Just one year la the Wilderness. On nearly the same ground Lee and Hooker had fought two years before, and now the first capt