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The Daily Dispatch: July 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 24 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Afternoon landscape: poems and translations 10 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Oldport days, with ten heliotype illustrations from views taken in Newport, R. I., expressly for this work. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 25, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Cleopatra or search for Cleopatra in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.9 (search)
ey go singing on to the sea through the ancient forests. While this is so, yet nearly one-half of the Christian world seeks Heaven through the mediation of a Jewish woman, and her image appears in every Catholic church and home, the noble christian substitute for the pagan gods and goddesses. The mother of the Saviour has taken the place of fabled mythology. But in this broad Protestant land the only monuments erected to woman, except Mary Washington, lately finished, are the obelisk or Cleopatra's needle, in Central Park, New York city, and the great statue of Liberty Enlightening the World, at the mouth of New York harbor—one given us by the French, and the other sent us by the Egyptians; the one perpetuating the memory of a bad woman, Caesar's and Mark Anthony's mistress, and the other representing a pagan goddess, in whose name all the agonies, bloodshed and horror of the French Revolution were perpetuated. But while the vices of an Egyptian woman speaks in one, and the social