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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 55 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 42 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 19 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 1 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Charles E. Hooker or search for Charles E. Hooker in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate dead in Stonewall Cemetery, Winchester, Va. Memorial services, June 6, 1894. (search)
f the address the Friendship Band played Dixie's Land. As soon as the crowd caught the old familiar air of Dixie there was an outburst of applause. The veterans' yelling and waving handkerchiefs, hats, lasted for several minutes. Congressman Charles E. Hooker was then introduced, and was received with applause. He apologized for not having manuscript, saying it was a task for him to write since the loss of his arm. He appeared dressed in Confederate gray, as did the late General Early, whts, and while apologizing for nothing, he spoke in generous terms of the bravery and heroism of the Federal soldiers. He paid a tribute to General Grant for refusing to allow General Lee to be indicted and imprisoned. At the conclusion of General Hooker's address Captain Williams adjourned the meeting until 3 o'clock, when the parade was formed, composed as follows: Major S. J. C. Moore, of Berryville, chief marshal; Friendship Fire Company, headed by the Friendship Military Band, 127 men; S
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Bond of heroism. (search)
sionary Ridge. It was told by General Joe Reynolds, who was on the staff of General Thomas. This officer pointed out on the map the elevation in front of Chattanooga where General Grant and General Thomas took position to see the grand advance of the divisions against the Confederate works at the bottom of the ridge. Back of these works rose the precipitous front of the ridge. It was Grant's plan of battle to have Sherman take the north end of the ridge and sweep toward the center, while Hooker took the south end and advanced from the opposite direction. While both of these movements were being executed, the army of Thomas, on the plain of Chattanooga, was to advance to the foot of the ridge, and carrying the works there, was to await orders, and move up to the summit at the proper time. Grant and Thomas, said General Reynolds, watched the advance through their glasses. They exchanged very few words. The long lines were in full view to us in the rear, as they moved forw
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.19 (search)
on from the total failure of the repeated assaults of the many Federal divisions upon Longstreet's Division alone, for thus since morning had been vainly employed Hooker and Kearney, Couch, Casey, Smith and others, until night found them all repulsed, with Hooker and Kearney so cut up and demoralized as to be of little further useHooker and Kearney so cut up and demoralized as to be of little further use for weeks. The battle was considered by General Johnston of such trivial consequence that it is given but a few lines of mention in his report, and in his Narrative he says it was but an affair of the rear guard with Longstreet only, for that Hill had but one regiment engaged, who stopped the Federal advance till the trains, djunction of the Yorktown and Warwick roads—along both of which came division after division of the Federals—was again and again vainly attacked by the division of Hooker and Kearney, and others as they came up, until by evening there were in his front these two and also Couch and Casey, who a few weeks after at Seven Pines this sa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
at never fired a gun. Jackson's Division, under J. R. Jones, and Ewell's Division, under Lawton, were nearly annihilated by the tremendous assault of Sumner's and Hooker's Corps. Jones was wounded; Starke, succeeding him, was killed; Lawton was wounded, and Early, succeeding him, found but little more than his own brigade left inkson's orders to do just what he had done. Early commanded the right wing of Lee's army during the battle of Chancellorsville, while Lee and Jackson surrounded Hooker with less than half of his numbers. With his division of four brigades and Barksdale's Brigade, and the reserve artillery, all told less than 10,000 men. Early heen two suns Hunter gave leg bail. It was said he should have captured Hunter; this is equivalent to saying that Lee should have captured Pope after Manassas, or Hooker after Chancellorsville, or Grant after Cold Harbor. It was said that he should have captured Washington; this absurdity has been exposed. Grant criticises Early
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
ion of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, 355. Gorgas, Gen., Josiah, 90. Greely, Horace, 35. Gregg, Percy, on the South, 93. Hampton, Gen., Wade. His duel with a Federal soldier at Gettysburg, 122; his capture of Grant's entire beef supply in 1864, 147; his force, 153; mentioned, 347. Hazlewood, Capt. Martin W., 48. Herald, Baltimore, Md , cited, 157. Heroism, The Bond of, 67. Hoge, D. D., Rev. M. D., 352. Hollywood Memorial Association. Their sacred labors, 388. Hooker, Hon. Charles E., 46. Howitzers, Richmond, 54. Howlett House, Recapture of the, in 1864, 20. Hunter, Captain in the 41st Virginia Infantry, killed, 105. Ironclads in the C. S. Navy, 75; in the English and French Navies, 77. Jackson, Stonewall, as a school-boy, as a teacher, and on entering the war, by R. R. Wilson, 157-162. Johnson, Gen. Bradley T., 347. Johnston, Gen. J. E. His campaigns in Georgia, i. Jones, Jr., Ll. D., Col. Chas. C., soldier, scholar, historian, a