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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.5 (search)
2d July, at Gettysburg, to which he refers in the quotation last made from his book, may we not ask what more urgent request he could have expected from General Lee that he should hasten to join him than is embraced in his own statement that orders for the troops to hasten their march of the 1st were sent without even a suggestion from him (General Lee), but upon his announcement that he intended to fight the next day, if the enemy was there? The greater portion of the two corps of Generals A. P. Hill and Ewell had been hotly engaged during the 1st July, with about an equal force of the enemy; the result was a great victory for General Lee's troops, and the enemy had been driven back some distance through the town of Gettysburg, to the heights beyond. It was of the first importance to follow up this success promptly. General Longstreet, with two of his divisions, camped at a point but four miles distant on the night of the 1st. He was made aware of what had occurred; he had rece
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.6 (search)
orrect everything. I happened to witness both events. One occurred on the 6th of May, 1864, early in the morning when A. P. Hill was being withdrawn to place Longstreet's Corps in position, because of the severe fighting of Hill's Corps on the 5thHill's Corps on the 5th of May. The Federals, by a strange chance, attacked Hill's Corps while withdrawing, which was thrown into great confusion, and retreated fighting. Longstreet's column was just coming up. General R. E. Lee started to lead them into action, to checkHill's Corps while withdrawing, which was thrown into great confusion, and retreated fighting. Longstreet's column was just coming up. General R. E. Lee started to lead them into action, to check the wild rush of the Federals. Many of us heard the Texas soldier tell General Lee to go to the rear. I was in a few feet of General Lee for a long time that morning, while trying to rally the retreating Confederates. He was on Old Traveler. G and hence the conflict. I commanded the Fourteenth Georgia Regiment, Thomas's Georgia Brigade, Wilcox's Division, and A. P. Hill's Corps, and saw both occurrences, and all writers nearly are correct. Captain R. D. Funkhouser writes from Mauverto
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
General Lee's army, at the beginning of the campaign, consisted of two divisions of Longstreet's Corps, Ewell's Corps, A. P. Hill's Corps, three divisions of cavalry and the artillery. I commanded, at different times during the campaign, Hill's andHill's and Ewell's Corps, and am, therefore, able to state very nearly the entire strength of the army. Ewell's Corps, to which I belonged, did not exceed 14,000 muskets at the beginning of the campaign. When I was placed in command of Hill's Corps on the 8tHill's Corps on the 8th of May, by reason of General Hill's sickness, its effective strength was less than 13,000 muskets, and it could not have exceeded 18,000 in the beginning. Longstreet's Corps was the weakest of the three, when all the divisions were present, and thGeneral Hill's sickness, its effective strength was less than 13,000 muskets, and it could not have exceeded 18,000 in the beginning. Longstreet's Corps was the weakest of the three, when all the divisions were present, and the two with him had just returned from an arduous and exhausting winter campaign in East Tennessee. His effective strength could not have exceeded 8,000 muskets. General Lee's whole effective infantry, therefore, did not exceed 40,000 muskets, if it
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.28 (search)
haplain of 47th Regiment of Virginia Infantry, Brockenbrough's Brigade, first A. P. Hill's Divison, Jackson's Corps, and afterwards Heth's Division, of A. P. Hill's CA. P. Hill's Corps, I witnessed the events leading to, and the opening of the fight on the morning of July 1st, and the final charge of the remnant of Heth's Division, under Pettigion I honor and love. About 2 o'clock P. M., on June 30, 1863, Heth's Division, Hill's Corps, leading the advance of the corps, reached Cashtown and went into bivouah numbered 1,000 men, as many men were left on the road in the rapid march of A. P. Hill's Corps to overtake Longstreet, and pass him in Clarke county, Virginia, oursand west of Gettysburg, which blocked the road by which the Confederate corps of Hill and Ewell were converging on Cashtown. Why need we look any further for causes.Respectfully, Jaquelin Marshall Meredith, Chaplain of 47th Virginia Infantry, Heth's Division, A. P. Hill's Corps, A. N.Va., C. S. Wide Water, Va., March 31, 1896.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.36 (search)
em. About 11 o'clock we came to the plank road, and turned up towards Chancellorsville. I felt as if I was on holy ground; for it was right along here that we marched the 1st day of May, thirty-three years ago, led by Lee and Jackson, and A. P. Hill, and Heth, and Mallory. It is just about as warm and dusky now as then. We soon came to the road that we took to the left by The Furnace, but our time being limited, we conclude it is not sufficient to take the route we marched around Hookerd by a bullet from our own men in our rear. Yes, brave old Tom Coghill, you took me to that very white oak tree, with scars on it now from top to bottom, and there we lay with Garland Smith behind us, until the fire slackened. Jackson and A. P. Hill both being wounded, Stuart was sent for during the night to command the corps, and our brigadier (Heth), was put in command of the Light Division, and Colonel J. M. Brockenbrough succeeded to the command of our brigade. And over the same gro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.37 (search)
un, John; Creacy, John, a gallant man, promoted to lieutenant, wounded, and captured at Gettysburg; Cronin, S. D.; Crumby, John, discharged; Dickerson, John T.; Dixon, John T.; Daniels, George C., wounded at Gettysburg; Driscoll, C., killed at Gettysburg; Ellington, Branch, killed at Cold Harbor, June, 1864; Elliott, Robert, killed at Gettysburg; Gaines, John C.; Gaines, William B., wounded at Sharpsburg; Green, William T.; Guill, John, died since the War; Garrison, John R.; Garrison, Joseph; Hill, James R.; Holt, Thomas, killed in seven-days' fight before Richmond; Holt, R. I., killed in seven-days' fight before Richmond; Holt, John Lee, killed at Gettysburg, 1864; Holt, J. P., killed at Drury's Bluff; 1862; Holt, R. M., wounded at South Mountain, 1862; Holt, B. N. M., wounded at Five Forks, 1865; Harvey, Wyatt C., teamster; Hamlett, E. W.; Hamlett, Jesse; Harvey, W. D., died since the war; Harvey, Thomas, died since the war; Hardiman, John E., wounded at Gaines's Mill and at Gettysbu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.48 (search)
ommand of Brigadier-General Wm. D. Pender, in the division of General A. P. Hill. An officer in describing the bearing of the 22d at Seven Gaines' Mill, June 27th, where it won the highest encomiums. General A. P. Hill says of it in his report of the battle: The 16th North Caroliarpsburg was fought. On that day the regiment, with the rest of A. P. Hill's Division, arrived on the battle-field after a forced march of s a division of Federals, which was promptly attacked by a part of A. P. Hill's command, routed and driven back across the Potomac at Shepherdsh Regiment, was assigned to the 22d as adjutant. On November 22, A. P. Hill's Division, which had been on duty near Martinsburg and at Snicke the right of Lee's army, and Pender's Brigade was on the left of A. P. Hill's Division in the first line. The regiment acquitted itself in tdjust the lines, much disordered by the persistant fighting, General A. P. Hill simply replied, Let the tired men sleep, a decision which, wi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.49 (search)
the next day. General Jackson, with his own division and those of A. P. Hill and Ewell, moved directly upon Harper's Ferry; General McLaws, wi and Ewell's, began the march to rejoin General Lee. He left General A. P. Hill with his division at Harper's Ferry to take charge of the capral McLaws reached Sharpsburg in the forenoon of the 17th. General A. P. Hill, with his division—except Thomas' Brigade, left in charge of ion of five brigades, R. H. Anderson's division of six brigades. A. P. Hill's division of five brigades (this other brigade was at Harper's F. H. Anderson reported to me with some 3,000 or 4,000 men. General A. P. Hill's command consisted of the brigades of Branch, Gregg, Archer,e exception of the brigade last mentioned and the two brigades of A. P. Hill's Division, which are estimated, the following recapitulation is 12 D. H. Hill's Division,3,000 R. H. Anderson's Division,4,000 A. P. Hill's Division,3,400 McLaws' Division,2,893 J. G. Walker's Division
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.59 (search)
ry battle in which the brigade participated. Before the fights around Richmond, Branch's Brigade was assigned to General A. P. Hill, and became a part of the famous Light Division. The 28th Regiment was with its brigade when it was the first, in rom Harper's Ferry to Sharpsburg. On reaching the right of the battlfield, the afternoon of the 17th of September, General A. P. Hill dashed up, and in person ordered it at a double-quick up the road to the left, leading to the town, to defend an unehaved as it had always done in the first day's fight at that place, when Lane's Brigade was ordered from the centre of A. P. Hill's line to the post of honor on the right to protect that flank of the army from the enemy's cavalry while it fought his the hard-pressed troops in the Wilderness when Colonel Venable, of General Lee's staff, said to Colonel Palmer, of General A. P. Hill's: Thank God! I will go back and tell General Lee that Lane has just gone in and will hold his ground until other