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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 286 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 136 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 124 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 117 9 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 95 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 78 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 76 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 57 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 52 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 49 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for James H. Lane or search for James H. Lane in all documents.

Your search returned 26 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.36 (search)
t is all plain now—we went straight, but the road makes a turn). It is there where we saw the deserted artillery, and the dead and wounded horses. All looks now just as it did then. I do not think the trees have grown a bit; even the bushes seem to be the same. Here is the place. We march by the left flank along the road a short distance, and halt, and front. Here is the place. Our left is near the brow of a low hill or rise. It is so dark that we cannot see a man across the road. Lane's skirmishers are in front and open fire just abreast of our left flank. In a short while a wounded man is borne along towards the rear, just behind our regiment. Several men were holding him up, and he was trying to walk, when brave Sergeant Tom Fogg recognized him, and said: Great God, it is General Jackson! Then the order is given to deploy the regiment as skirmishers, and almost immediately the road was swept by such a destructive artillery fire as can only be imagined. I don't beli
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.47 (search)
North Carolina soldiers. [from the Wilmington, N. C., Messenger, Feb. 19, 1895.] Paroled at Appomattox. North Carolina had paroled at Appomattox Courthouse, one major-general, Bryan Grimes, and six brigadiers, i. e., W. R. Cox, Matthew W. Ransom, John R. Cooke, William McRae, W. P. Roberts and J. H. Lane. BrigadeCommanded by Total rank and file surrendered. 1. Cox's,Brigadier-General Cox,572 2. Grimes',Colonel Coward,530 3. Johnston's,Colonel Lea,463 4. Lewis',Captain Beard,447 5. Cooke's,Brigadier-General Cooke,560 6. MacRae's,Brigadier-General MacRae,442 7. Lane's,Brigadier-General Lane,570 8. Scales',Colonel Hyman,719 9. Ransom's,Brigadier-General Ransom,435 10. Barringer's, Cavalry.—— —— ——23 11. Robert's, Cavalry.Brigadier-General Roberts,93 Major-General Grimes and staff, Cummings', Miller's, William's, Flanners' and Ramsey's batteries,150 —— Total North Carolinians paroled5,022 The following North Carolina regiments we
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.59 (search)
rlotte (N. C.) observer, Feb. 17, 1895.] General J. H. Lane writes its history. Another of the Hist published. In a private letter to the editor General Lane says of his work: My old regiment hataff officers during the war: Colonels: James H. Lane, Samuel D. Lowe. Lieutenant-Colonels: Twe had an election for field officers, when Colonel Lane and Lieutenant-Colonel Lowe were elected toaptain Holland, of Company H, congratulated General Lane on his escape, he added: And I am indebted s, it moved handsomely forward with the rest of Lane's brave fellows who took the position of those ourthouse, when Johnson's front was broken, and Lane's North Carolina veterans turned the tide of Feto the huts. Next day, General Lee ordered General Lane to dislodge him. General Lane, who was in cGeneral Lane, who was in command of the division at the time, did so at daylight the following morning, with all of the sharpswhen Grant made his final attack at Petersburg, Lane's Brigade was cut in two by an overwhelming for[13 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The laying of the corner-stone of the monument to President Jefferson Davis, (search)
anization and service, 353. James, Captain C. F., 83. James, Captain George S., 111. Jones' Farm, Battle of, 337. Jones. General Sam., 67. Johnson, General Bull, 81. Johnson, General Bradley T., 117. Johnston, General, Albert Sidney, 119 Johnston, Colonel, William Preston, 122. Kenney's Farm, Battle of, 329. Kentucky, Attitude of in 1861, 295; soldiers in Mexican war, 59. Kilpatrick and Dahlgren Raid, 278. King William Artillery, Carter's Battery, Roster of, 156 Lane, General James H., 324. Lasker, M., services in Texas, 49. Last Battle of the War. 309. Last Gun fired in the War, 42. Latane, Burial of, Account of the, 192. Laughlin, Captain, Wm., 248. Libby, Captain H. S., 225. Lee's Campaign in 1862 compared with that of Grant in 1864, 138; forces in 1864, 177. Lee and Longstreet — a criticism, by Colonel Walter H. Taylor, 73. Lee to the rear, Accounts of the incident, 79. Lee, General Stephen D., 111; Oration by, at the laying