hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 22, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Alexander McComas or search for Alexander McComas in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
West Fayette street, and wounded others. The first shot was fired by the soldiers at Pratt street bridge, and at the corner of Gay street the first round was fired by the soldiers, and a number of citizens fell. When it became evident that the troops were firing with ball cartridges there was a mad rush for arms. The crowd first went to the armory, but that was closely guarded, and then there was a rush for the gun shops. The store of J. C. J. Meyer, on Pratt street, and that of Alexander McComas, on South Calvert street, were invaded and the guns, pistols and ammunition were taken. At the first of the collison the people were entirely unarmed. Mayor Brown. Mayor Brown received the news of the arrival of the Northern troops at his law office, on St. Paul street. Marshal Kane sent word to him that the troops were about to arrive and that he expected a disturbance. The Mayor, accompanied by the counselor of the city, Mr. George M. Gill, rode rapidly to Camden Station in a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
West Fayette street, and wounded others. The first shot was fired by the soldiers at Pratt street bridge, and at the corner of Gay street the first round was fired by the soldiers, and a number of citizens fell. When it became evident that the troops were firing with ball cartridges there was a mad rush for arms. The crowd first went to the armory, but that was closely guarded, and then there was a rush for the gun shops. The store of J. C. J. Meyer, on Pratt street, and that of Alexander McComas, on South Calvert street, were invaded and the guns, pistols and ammunition were taken. At the first of the collison the people were entirely unarmed. Mayor Brown. Mayor Brown received the news of the arrival of the Northern troops at his law office, on St. Paul street. Marshal Kane sent word to him that the troops were about to arrive and that he expected a disturbance. The Mayor, accompanied by the counselor of the city, Mr. George M. Gill, rode rapidly to Camden Station in a