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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 476 2 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 164 8 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 160 20 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 131 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 114 6 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 102 2 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 68 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 59 3 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 45 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 33 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Zachary Taylor or search for Zachary Taylor in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Ladies' Confederate Memorial Association Listens to a masterly oration by Judge Charles E. Fenner. (search)
and by an enterprising eagerness to seek employment on every difficult or dangerous service. While still in the regiment of infantry, then commanded by Colonel Zachary Taylor, he had met and fallen in love with his colonel's daughter, and had proposed to and been accepted by her. In 1835 he resigned from the army and married Miss Taylor. He then determined to devote himself to the occupation of a planter, and, accepting the invitation of his eldest brother, Joseph E. Davis, he, with his bride, removed to his brother's plantation in Warren county, Mississippi, and employed himself in the opening and establishment of the Brierfield plantation, adjoinr active service in the field. He immediately accepted, and repairing to Mississippi, completed its organization and promptly joined the army then fighting under Taylor. The record of the brilliant exploits of Jefferson Davis and his Mississippi Rifles forms one of the most conspicuous chapters in the history of that war. He
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
Lincoln. Stephens and Lincoln. On the morning of February 3d, the commissioners met President Lincoln and Secretary Seward on board of a steamer anchored in Hampton Roads, near Fortress Monroe. Mr. Stephens and Mr. Lincoln had been acquaintances and friends in former years. They had been in the House of Representatives at the same time, had belonged to the same political party and as members of the Congressional Taylor Club, had co-operated in the nomination and election of Zachary Taylor to the presidency in 1848. At the beginning of the interview, Mr. Stephens, addressing himself to Mr. Lincoln, made pleasant allusion to their former acquaintance and friendship, to which the latter cordially responded. After mutual inquiries as to former congressional associates, Mr. Stephens introduced the business of the meeting by inquiring of Mr. Lincoln if there was no way of putting an end to the existing troubles, and bringing about a restoration of good feeling and harmony b
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
Lincoln. Stephens and Lincoln. On the morning of February 3d, the commissioners met President Lincoln and Secretary Seward on board of a steamer anchored in Hampton Roads, near Fortress Monroe. Mr. Stephens and Mr. Lincoln had been acquaintances and friends in former years. They had been in the House of Representatives at the same time, had belonged to the same political party and as members of the Congressional Taylor Club, had co-operated in the nomination and election of Zachary Taylor to the presidency in 1848. At the beginning of the interview, Mr. Stephens, addressing himself to Mr. Lincoln, made pleasant allusion to their former acquaintance and friendship, to which the latter cordially responded. After mutual inquiries as to former congressional associates, Mr. Stephens introduced the business of the meeting by inquiring of Mr. Lincoln if there was no way of putting an end to the existing troubles, and bringing about a restoration of good feeling and harmony b