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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 105 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 100 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 95 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 72 6 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 71 7 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 70 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 67 9 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 52 2 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 50 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 47 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Gordon Granger or search for Gordon Granger in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 1 document section:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.46 (search)
52,392 infantry, 177 guns and 8,000 cavalry, making an effective force of more than 600,000 men, while a division of Gordon Granger's Corps was at Shell Mound. General Bragg's force consisted of Polk's Corps, 12,027 strong; D. H. Hill, 11,972; Bucknight and promptness which always characterized Forrest, he dashed away with Armstrong's Brigade to meet this new enemy. Granger, with 5,000 fresh troops and three batteries, was pushing on to relieve Thomas. Forrest, with his small force, became quickly engaged, and forced Granger to halt, and, although too weak to long stay his advance, compelled Granger to deflect some distance from the main direction. Thomas has been accredited with great stubbornness and tenacity in holding his positionGranger to deflect some distance from the main direction. Thomas has been accredited with great stubbornness and tenacity in holding his position, but when we look into the facts we are compelled to find that his ability to do so was due more to the inaction of the Confederate troops on the right than to any special credit due Thomas. It is a fact that our entire right wing, for two hours o