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the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 14 0 Browse Search
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the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians, Introductory Sketch of the early history of Unitarianism in England. (search)
openly or covertly denied the deity of Christ. Of these some adopted the Arian sentiment, others that of the proper humanity of Christ, afterwards maintained by Socinus. A few of the Baptists appear to have made their way into England even before the half-reformation of Henry VIII., and did not escape the fiery trial allotted to converted by the perusal of the first copy of the Fratres Poloni which was brought into this country. Hales's celebrated tract on Schism is chiefly derived from Socinus; and the works of Chillingworth frequently betray a familiarity with the Polish writers. His well-known letter to Dr. Sheldon, in which he argues the question of the basis of an argument not less inconclusive than it was illiberal and unjust. The writers of these anonymous tracts approached most nearly to the system of Socinus; but in the succeeding age, the learning and high reputation of Clarke and Whiston in the Church of England, and of Emlyn and Peirce among the Dissenters, led the
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians, John Biddle (search)
sonable doctrines upon the same ground be exploded, especially seeing there is scarce any one of them that can plead so plausible a colour of scripture for itself as that can? Another piece translated by Mr. Biddle was Przipcovius's Life of F. Socinus, with the preliminary discourse prefixed by that writer to the works of Socinus. His views in this publication, says Dr. Toulmin, appear to have been truly laudable and liberal; namely, to do justice to a character which had been much aspersedSocinus. His views in this publication, says Dr. Toulmin, appear to have been truly laudable and liberal; namely, to do justice to a character which had been much aspersed, and to hold up to contemplation a great example, at the same time that he enters a caveat against an implicit deference to the judgment of his hero. At this period our author also published two remarkable tracts in the catechetical form, explanatory of his peculiar views of Christian doctrine; one entitled A Scripture Catechism, the other A Brief Scripture Catechism for Children; in which the apparently unexceptionable plan is pursued, of leaving the scripture to speak for itself, by const
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians, Thomas Emlyn (search)
lly brought to prove the preexist-ence of our Saviour as the great Spirit or Logos by whose instrumentality God created the material world. He therefore espoused what has since been called the High Arian hypothesis, in which he continued during the rest of his life. In these sentiments he agreed nearly with Whiston, Clarke, Peirce, and many other eminent divines of that and the immediately succeeding age, whose celebrity for a long period gave the Arian scheme the preference over that of Socinus. When James II. was driven back to France, and affairs in Ireland assumed a more peaceable and settled appearance, Mr. Emlyn was induced to accept a second overture to become joint pastor with Mr. Joseph Boyse of the Presbyterian congregation in Wood Street, Dublin. To this city he accordingly removed in 1691; and here he continued in a station of great comfort and prosperity for nearly twelve years. Mr. Emlyn appears to have been a highly popular and acceptable preacher, and the sermo
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians, James Peirce (search)
Son of God, is over all, God blessed for ever, Rom. IX. 5. I further declare, that when Ananias and Sapphira did lie unto the Holy Ghost, they did not lie unto men, but unto God. And the bodies of believers being the temples of the Holy Ghost, (1 Cor. VI. 19,) are the temples of God, (1 Cor. III. 16, 17,) and yet, to us there is but one God, the Father, of Whom are all things, 1 Cor. VIII. 6. Mr. Peirce gave his creed in the following terms; I am not of the opinion of Sabellius, Arius, Socinus, or Sherlock. I believe there is but one God, and can be no more. I believe the Son and Holy Ghost to be divine persons, but subordinate to the Father; and the unity of God I think is to be resolved into the Father's being the fountain of the divinity of the Son and Spirit. Three others, when called on, denied the authority of the meeting to require of them an account of their faith, and positively refused to make any declaration; and Mr. Peirce, in the account he has left of these proce