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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—secession. (search)
ween the two hostile parties. But their old attachment to the Constitution got also the better of their sympathies for their neighbors engaged in rebellion. Governor Hicks of Maryland resisted every attempt to drag that State into secession. The legislature of Kentucky and the electoral colleges of Tennessee and North Carolina the Union could not prevent the secessionists from taking the initiative of insurrection. The militia of Maryland, having assembled spontaneously in spite of Mr. Hicks, took possession of Annapolis, the capital of the State, and of the Federal naval school, which was located there. The Texans seized the transport-ship Star of se task it had on hand. The legislature of Maryland, having met at Frederick, the very centre of the insurrection, despite the loyal though feeble efforts of Governor Hicks, protested in vain against the bold proceedings of Butler; but the militia, which had been called out, did not dare to trouble the latter. At the other ext