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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 46 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 18 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Lee's Hill (Virginia, United States) or search for Lee's Hill (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book VI:—Virginia. (search)
g between its positions and the ditch. The hillock over which the Telegraph Road passes after crossing Hazel Run, and which at a later period was denominated Lee's Hill, was also covered with several redoubts, which enfiladed this road and completely flanked the positions of Marye's Hill. This hillock, as well as those extendit adversaries as Lee and his lieutenants. But even if he had succeeded in deceiving them for an instant, the troops to whom the guarding of Marye's Heights and Lee's Hill had been entrusted for the last three weeks would have sufficed to repel any direct attack upon those heights. At a council of war which he held prior to putt railroad, whence they could strike in flank any column marching toward the extreme end of the wood above mentioned. Most of Hood's guns occupied the summit of Lee's Hill, from which they enfiladed the Telegraph Road. Two large thirty-pounders, recently brought from the Richmond foundry, had been added to their number on the even