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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 105 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 100 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 95 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 72 6 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 71 7 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 70 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 67 9 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 52 2 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 50 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 47 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Gordon Granger or search for Gordon Granger in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—--the Mississippi. (search)
ruction in Kentucky, soon swell the number of Granger's soldiers to more than fourteen thousand; hi all his forces into line south of Franklin. Granger hastened to join him, bringing Baird's brigadposition with that of Murfreesborough. While Granger is hastening to Franklin, Steedman, on the moth a second brigade brought from Nashville by Granger. Minty's cavalry closely follows, and joins 's positions, and it is only on the 10th that Granger is enabled to make a serious effort to cross reach them he must slip between Nashville and Granger's division, stationed at Franklin. Van Dorn must hasten to get away from the troops which Granger cannot fail to send against them as soon as hon as he felt reassured regarding the fate of Granger he resumed his task, and was able to lead Stahborhood of Murfreesborough. The troops that Granger had brought from Kentucky, which had been num, and possibly reduce them to surrender. But Granger, at the first news of the attack on Franklin,[10 more...]