hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 16 16 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 5 5 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 3 3 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for 1100 AD or search for 1100 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—the Third winter. (search)
and, caused it to scatter in the air, but it would come down and cover the furrows, thus constantly effacing the tracks of the shells and bullets. Not to revert to this subject, we shall say that, according to the calculations made by General Gillmore on the weight of the projectiles thrown against the fort and the damage resulting therefrom, it required nearly sixty-six pounds of iron to displace two hundred and nineteen pounds of sand. This sand weighs 86 pounds to the cubic foot (about 1100 kilogrammes to the cubic metre): it absorbs 24 pounds of water in a cubic foot (about 300 kilogrammes to the cubic metre), and loses then, with 5 per cent. of its volume, a part of its resistance to shots. Under these circumstances a bombardment could produce no decisive effect unless it were the destruction of the uncovered cannon behind the parapet. While the artillery of Fort Wagner, supported by Sumter's heavy ordnance, sought to delay the construction of the Federal batteries, Beaureg