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Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 50 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 25 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 19 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 5 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 15 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 13 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Fagan or search for Fagan in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 2 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—the Third winter. (search)
down the right bank of the Mississippi. He therefore had with him his own division of infantry, Fagan's brigade, and Marmaduke's division of cavalry, with a few batteries of artillery. The departurad with him only his division of infantry, composed of Tappan's, Frost's, and McCrea's brigades, Fagan's brigade, and Marmaduke's division of cavalry, comprising Dobbin's brigade and Shelby's. He was stop, or at least retard, their march and give his army time to reach Arkadelphia before them. Fagan's and Tappan's brigades of infantry followed the cavalry to cover the left flank of the column. Arkansas, the waters of the bayou, whose swamps rendered the banks everywhere else inaccessible, Fagan and Tappan had joined Marmaduke. The latter had immediately assumed a new position, in which heouthern army is in full retreat. Marmaduke, having attained the end he had in view, has allowed Fagan and Tappan to depart, and about five o'clock he, in turn, suddenly disappears in front of the Fe
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the war in the South-West. (search)
e Rock. The infantry that Price had retained, belonging to Fagan's old division, was concentrated at Spring Hill, a village kadelphia to Shreveport. His cavalry, divided between Generals Fagan and Marmaduke, was guarding the Washita: the one was ner to disguise the inactivity of his infantry, had directed Fagan to cross to the left side of the Washita with his three thoch alone had been reported on the way from Pine Bluff. But Fagan, having learned of the departure of the train, makes a forc The bulk of the escort has already passed the defile when Fagan, arriving unexpectedly, attacks it with vigor. While the Fst of their halt, are forming themselves in line of battle, Fagan, who has more than five thousand cavalry under him, extendsle for the wagons and the artillery. It was high time, for Fagan, by Kirby Smith's orders, started immediately after the batwill not find another, for they cannot cross the river, and Fagan, to make worse the blunder which led him to Arkadelphia, ha