Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Meridian (Mississippi, United States) or search for Meridian (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—eastern Tennessee. (search)
er. Buckner, who had twenty thousand men near Knoxville, and Johnston, who had thirty thousand under his orders between Meridian and Mobile, might without any uneasiness have furnished Bragg a contingent which would have doubled the effective force ston had divided his forces between Chattanooga and Mobile, Gregg's and McNair's brigades alone occupied the junction at Meridian and the neighboring camp at Enterprise. Meridian was the key to the network of railways which the Confederates still poMeridian was the key to the network of railways which the Confederates still possessed in Mississippi and Alabama; Enterprise was the rendezvous for all prisoners liberated on parole, who, willingly or unwillingly, came to recompose under Hardee the old army formerly under the command of Pemberton. However, Johnston, learning the morning, and are going immediately to reinforce Hood's corps. The third brigade, under Gist's orders, arrives from Meridian and belongs to Walker's corps: it was moved in the direction of Alexander's Bridge, with a train which it escorted, and
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the siege of Chattanooga. (search)
s with him, is aware of the service which he renders to the Federal cause by opening a new and vast field of activity to the military genius of Sherman. Thus, Grant retains for himself on the Mississippi only one division at Memphis and three near Vicksburg. Ord by placing his troops en ├ęchelon shall be able easily to watch the course of the river from Natchez as far as Bayou Sara, near the town of Port Hudson, which is occupied by Banks. A portion of Johnston's army has remained between Meridian and Jackson; his cavalry is overrunning the northern part of the State of Mississippi: it is necessary to prevent these forces from making an offensive movement on the Big Black River or impeding the progress of the divisions sent to Rosecrans' assistance. McPherson receives orders to detain Johnston's forces by a vigorous demonstration against Canton and Jackson. On the other hand, Grant takes measures to prevent fresh delays in the transmission of orders received from his chief. Howe
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—the Third winter. (search)
he end of eight days, on the 18th of December, this time better inspired, he replaces him by the illustrious general who was vegetating in Mississippi, useless and almost in disgrace, at the head of a skeleton army. Johnston, relinquishing his command to Polk, immediately takes the road to Dalton. He reaches this last point on the 26th of December, and finds the Army of the Tennessee still more weakened since Bragg left it. In fact, the two brigades of Quarles and Baldwin have returned to Meridian, while the bad weather is painfully trying upon the troops encamped around Dalton. We have arrived at the close of the year 1863. However, before terminating this chapter, we must say a few words about the operations of the Confederate cavalry. We left Johnston's cavalry divided between Chalmers and S. D. Lee, who, one to the west, the other to the east, of Eastport, have vainly endeavored to interrupt Sherman's march. It received shortly thereafter an important reinforcement. Forres
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the war in the South-West. (search)
nd Macon, across the swamps of Okanoxubee, to Meridian, at which he should arrive, it was agreed, onrt of the wagons and locomotives collected at Meridian had been carried away by Polk. There was stiDemopolis. In order to extend farther around Meridian the zone of destruction, Sherman was waiting enant as he had expected to see him arrive at Meridian at the same time he did. He availed himself o so uselessly undertaken to rejoin Sherman at Meridian. The latter expected that his lieutenant shoon cavalry might yet have rejoined Sherman at Meridian if it had accelerated its pace. In fact, by trip him and to place himself between him and Meridian with all his forces, for on that same day, thdversaries while Sherman was marching against Meridian. The expedition which the latter had organherman to make, during his expedition against Meridian, a demonstration which would prevent Johnstonely his own forces, undertook the campaign of Meridian related in the preceding chapter. As soon as[15 more...]