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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 180 180 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 28 28 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 27 27 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 24 24 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 18 18 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 13 13 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 12 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 10 10 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. 7 7 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for 1822 AD or search for 1822 AD in all documents.

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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2., The development of the public School of Medford. (search)
presented her bill for schooling Mrs. Butterfield's three children and received on Jan. 10, 1798, an order on the Treasurer for $6.84. The town passed the same vote regarding the payment of tuition in 1799, again in 1800, and also in 1801, when they voted that the Interest of the money Received for the land left the Town by Isaac Royal Esq. be applied to pay the Schooling of such Children whose Parents are unable to pay for them. Payments for tuition of young children were made from 1798 to 1822, even after the establishment of free primary schools. The teachers of private schools who received payment from the town during this time were as follows in the order of their appearance on the books of the selectmen: Eliza Francis, Sally Tufts, Prudence Foster, Mrs. Johnson (?), Mrs. Benj. Pratt, Rebecca Blanchard, Susanna Usher, Abigail Simonds, Lucy Shedd, Hannah Greenleaf, Bethiah Hatch, Harriet Greenleaf, Betsey Stimpson, Susan Hall, Elizabeth M. Bradbury, Nancy Fulton. Mrs. Johnson v
notoriously unpopular, it was either unfinished or at least not published. A copy of it came into the possession of the Centinel and was published as an interesting source of local history. That portion relating to Medford is here given in full: Houses.Families.Males under 16.Females under 16.Males over 16.Females over 16.Negroes.Total 10414716115020722349790 The negroes thus constituted one-sixteenth of the population of the town in 1765. By way of comparison it may be added that in 1822 Medford had 1,474 inhabitants; in 57 years it had failed to double its population. As the ratio of whites to blacks in the colony at large was 45:1, it is seen that Medford had an unusually large negro population. So far as I have found records, a strong, able-bodied negro was worth, in 1700, about £ 18. In the inventory of Maj. Jonathan Wade's property appears the following asset: 5 negroes£ 97; and elsewhere in his papers is the record: 2 negroes that died appraised @ £ 35. Still, it