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the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 44 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 32 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 12 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 11 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. 10 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 11.. You can also browse the collection for Unitarian or search for Unitarian in all documents.

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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 11., Ye olde Meting-House of Meadford. (search)
to consider them as cold and austere. We do well to remember the circumstances under which they came to these shores; the persecutions they endured and finally fled from; to remember that they established the civil and religious liberty we enjoy and not to allow the present time to degenerate into civil and religious license. I find no record of theological differences in the old meeting-house. The Quaker or Baptist may have been there, but that time was long before the Universalist, Unitarian, or Methodist-Episcopal. The churches of England and of Rome, the ancient Medfordites would have none of. This is evident in the fact that, in the acts of worship and observation of times, everything was diametrically opposite. Even the Holy Scriptures were unread in the meeting-house, and not until 1755 was there a Bible upon the pulpit. No lights gleamed or candles flickered from its windows on Sunday night, for the Sabbath began at sunset on Saturday. One Medford man is credited wi
n? I am exceedingly sorry that any sectarian feelings should exist, but they do exist so strongly in some minds that they will not give a single mite unless the agent is in accordance with their views in his religious sentiments. This letter is endorsed answered. I wish the deacon had kept a copy as he sometimes did, for I think this communication may have been pithy. Orthodox to the backbone, he did not assert sectarianism in his temperance work; for in Medford, Rev. Caleb Stetson, Unitarian, Rev. Hosea Ballou, Universalist, with his parishioners, Timothy Cotting and James O. Curtis, and others from every denomination in town, worked to stamp out intemperance, and to encourage legislation against illegal liquor selling. The fight against intemperance and slavery, in which Deacon James was prominent, brought down all religious barriers and healed many old wounds made by doctrinal differences. In conjunction with the temperance movement, an attempt was made to carry on the