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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. 18 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. 14 4 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 15.. You can also browse the collection for Marshall Symmes or search for Marshall Symmes in all documents.

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llowing article. and he in age and feebleness extreme. Their names, so far as can now be ascertained, were Asa Law, Marshall Symmes, William B. Thomas, Henry Richardson, Alfred Tufts, Henry Reed, David S. Hooker, Mark Durgin, Samuel F. Woodbridge and John Frost. How many beside Mr. Symmes were natives of Medford is unknown. Various occupations they had. Mr. Law, who bore the military title of Colonel, was in the engraving business, and also at times officiated as an auctioneer. Mr. SymmeMr. Symmes was a farmer, and resided at Symmes' Corner in Upper Medford, in Governor Brooks' birthplace, and when Winchester was incorporated was thus arbitrarily moved out of town. Mr. Thomas was a carpenter, skilled at his trade, and served the town in varSymmes' Corner in Upper Medford, in Governor Brooks' birthplace, and when Winchester was incorporated was thus arbitrarily moved out of town. Mr. Thomas was a carpenter, skilled at his trade, and served the town in various offices. Mr. Richardson and Mr. Reed were ship-carpenters in the days when things were lively on the Mystic. Mr. Woodbridge was a Faneuil Hall market-man, and John Frost was a fish man whose white head gained him the sobriquet of Jack Frost.
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 15., Marshall Symmes of Upper Medford. (search)
Marshall Symmes of Upper Medford. Since the preceding article on the 18-18 Boys was prepared, Marshall Symmes, the last of the company, has passed away. His death occurred on July 19, 1911, at Marshall Symmes, the last of the company, has passed away. His death occurred on July 19, 1911, at his home in Winchester, of which town he was the oldest resident. He always lived near his birthplace, which was, in 1818 and till 1850, in that part of Upper Medford known as Symmes' Corner. He waSymmes' Corner. He was seventh in descent from Rev. Zachariah Symmes, the first minister of the Charlestown church. The ancestral home was upon the minister's farm, granted to him in those early colonial days. Some poot of Medford, as has been stated), having been born in what became the former residence of Marshall Symmes, and at a date prior to the annexation to Medford. Reverend Zachariah had a large posterresent time the Marshall Symmes farm is passing somewhat into residential sites, but the name of Symmes' Corner clings to the locality, with its diverging streets, though that of Upper Medford has bee