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the year 1851, and in the yard of Sprague and James) which may be seen at the Historical Building. Within two years there has come to the Society a photograph of the Syren lying at a wharf; also from Mr. Shepherd Brooks a photograph of the Ellen Brooks, 480 tons, built by George Fuller for R. D. Shepherd in 1834, the 197th in the list of Medford-built ships. These are especially interesting. The Syren is given as 1,050 tons in the list in Brooks' history. In 1851 Frederic Gleason of Bos97th in the list of Medford-built ships. These are especially interesting. The Syren is given as 1,050 tons in the list in Brooks' history. In 1851 Frederic Gleason of Boston began the weekly publication of Gleason's Pictorial, probably the first of its kind. Its illustrations were wood cuts, as it was long before the modern half-tone process. An examination of its pages is well worth making, and therein we find one of the Syren and reproduce here the text. Vol I, p. 149, (July 5, 1851):
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22., The Register's twenty-second volume. (search)
s prepared for and read at the meetings. In recent years there have been fewer of local interest thus presented, but the Register has gathered otherwise much that will be valuable to the future historian of Medford. Prior to 1855, the time of Mr. Brooks' writing, there had been comparatively few town histories written. It was then a source of regret that the work was not earlier begun. These twenty-two volumes contain 2,344 pages, exclusive of title pages, index and illustrations. Their p Register has continued to appear, though sometimes belated. On one occasion an annual deficit was prevented by the timely gift of one hundred dollars, by a grandson of a former Medford clergyman. The town in 1855 from its treasury assisted Mr. Brooks in his publication, and in 1886, Mr. Usher more largely in his. For his careful work in 1905, Mr. Hooper received no remuneration whatever, nor has the Historical Society ever (contrary to current impression) received any financial aid in its w