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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 28., Medford and her Minute Men, April 19, 1775. (search)
prehension. In the last hour of that restless day two spots of light carried their rays from the steeple of the North Church in Boston up the valley of the Mystic. With the new day, the nineteenth, a horse and rider burst over the crest of Winter hill and dashed down the slope along the road from Charlestown into the sleeping town. On the left, as they drew nearer the bridge, the rider passed the mansion house of Isaac Royall, set back in the midst of its ample estate. The glint of moonlin was so advanced that along the roadside was the waving grass of summer. Over the same route, in the afternoon, as far as the square, came three hundred men from Salem. They turned down the Charlestown road where, as they reached the top of Winter hill at the edge of early evening, they witnessed the running fight upon the exhausted British. To these Minute Men from other towns, as they passed the house from which her husband, the Rev. Edward Brooks, had ridden off in the morning, Abagail B
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 28.,
Medford Square
in the early days. (search)
The story reads: One Dalkin of Medford, with his wife, had been to Cambridge for the Sabbath, and returning found the tide too high at the ford for a safe passage. Dalkin got over but told his better-half to wait for the tide to recede; but she persisted in crossing, and losing her footing was borne along by the current. Dalkin shouted loudly for help and their faithful dog plunged in after his mistress, who, seizing the dog's tail, was safely towed ashore. Another road was in time developed, first called the way to Blanchard's. Blanchard was the owner of a house built in 1657, then in Malden, but now by annexation, in Medford, the oldest house in our city. We know it as the Blanchard-Bradbury-Wellington house. Next, this road was Distil-house lane, later Ship street and now Riverside avenue. In 1754 two portions of Charlestown were annexed, on opposite sides of Medford, extending from top of Winter hill a mile into present Winchester. To be concluded in December Issue.
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 28.,
Medford Square
in the early days. (search)
o old-time sky-scrapers, standing in this spot, and others took their places on both sides of the river, notably the Green grain mill and elevator, now Leahy's building. The railroad station had its fiery trials also, and others await it. Note the views of the town hall and see how much lower the square used to be. In April of '5, time of Minot's Light storm, its trial was by water, the tide so high that boats were used in the square. During the ‘60s a horse railroad ran its cars from Winter hill to River street, better known as Dead Man's alley, because it bordered the old graveyard. But in 1874 they ceased to run, and finally the tracks were taken up to await later days and electric power. Now, Dead Man's alley is to be widened, and with it will go another landmark, the house of Constable Richard Sprague, built in 1730. At the apex of the triangle still stands the three-story brick house, recently vacated and soon to disappear. This is the last vestige of the first comers