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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 36 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 32 4 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 20 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 18 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 14 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 30.. You can also browse the collection for Macaulay or search for Macaulay in all documents.

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The Bay path. [Read before the Medford Historical Society by Mr. Wilson Fiske.] SO good a historian as Lord Macaulay declared that of all human inventions, the alphabet and the printing press excepted, those inventions which abridge distance (that is, which promote inter-communication) had done most for mankind. Which is equivalent to saying that man rises above the savage only when and only so far as he establishes communication and effects co-operation with his fellows. And Macaulay knew not the telegraph, the telephone, the wireless, the airplane, the automobile, the bicycle—hardly the locomotive. How must we be civilized now? Now I propose to speak of the road and a road; and the road is the very sign and symbol of inter-communication. This must have been recognized a very long time ago. If we would seek the best word on roads and road-making (which is not the last word, but perhaps more nearly the first) we must look back more than five and twenty centuries to the u