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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 197 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 21 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 97 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 91 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 71 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 68 12 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 62 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 60 4 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 56 26 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 13, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) or search for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

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ay mark out for themselves — we will invite them to generous rivalry in all that develops the highest of every nation. [Applause.] And now, with the best wishes to you, gentlemen, and success to our common government, this day announced, I bid you good night. As the speaker retired, three cheers were given for "Hon. A. H. Stephens, of Georgia, the first Vice President of the Confederate States of North America." The Provisional capital of the New Confederacy. The city of Montgomery, the capital of Alabama, has assumed such a sudden importance as the capital of the Southern Confederacy, and the seat of the Federal operations of the new Government, that we give below a brief sketch of its locality and surroundings. It is situated on the left bank of the Alabama river, 331 miles by water from Mobile, and is 839 miles from Washington, D. C. It is the second city in the State in respect to trade and population, and is one of the most flourishing inland towns of the South
he will be immediately reinforced. That is all he desires. The Secretaries of War and of the Navy have been engaged for some time in arranging matters to that end. It appears by letters received here from Charleston that the people doubt their ability to take Fort Sumter. A gentleman there writing to this city says the impression is very general among the military men that they would not be able to take it; that whether they take it or not, there must be a fearful loss of life. The President has received intelligence from Charleston stating that Gov. Pickens had referred the question of Fort Sumter--it having now become a national question --to the Government of the Southern Confederacy at Montgomery, and that no movement would be made looking to an attack until action had been taken by the Southern Republic. But, on the heels of this intelligence, information has been received here to the effect that the Republic had decided at once to invest Forts Pickens and Sumter.