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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 42 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 34 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 8, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Virginians or search for Virginians in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

e it up themselves, from the palpable certainty that when people alter their country's allegiance at all, they will wish to do so to some purpose, and for good. The whole question will be narrowed down to this-- will Virginia go with the Southern States, or stay with the Northern States? That question must be answered, that choice must be made; for actual events and the calls of government will not permit it to be put aside. Now, when forced to choose, there can be no doubt but that all Virginians, except a little clique of impotent traitors and obscure Abolitionists,--whom the majority can convince in their own way, --will elect for the South.--Supposing this State to be as selfish and abject as Seward believes, interest is too imperative to permit hesitation. Choice for the North would be pecuniary disaster, compared to which the crises of ' 37 and '57 were as the explosion of two bladders to the bursting of a cannon; for then the slaves and their masters, too, would go, not grad
ints at, coercion, that in less than six months you will see a Southern army invading the North under the lead of President Davis in person. I say "my prediction," it is not prediction, and I now tell you what I know, that it will be done, and Virginians — yes, Virginians, resident in your own State, will be in the scrummage. Do you doubt it? if you do, you need not doubt any more. Look at President Davis' Inaugural again, and all men who know Davis, knows he never speaks words without meaniVirginians, resident in your own State, will be in the scrummage. Do you doubt it? if you do, you need not doubt any more. Look at President Davis' Inaugural again, and all men who know Davis, knows he never speaks words without meaning. Seward, if no one else, understands him, for he has stripped him many a time of his hellish masks and held him up in his naked deformity to the world. Yes, Seward knows Davis. This war is a game that takes two to play at, and when once commenced it will not be ended on Southern soil. The people here are just as cool and as dispassionate to- day as if Lincoln had never lived. We are prepared for the most, and the worst, and we now say, "lay on Macduff." Our harbor is filled with ves
The Daily Dispatch: March 8, 1861., [Electronic resource], The Virginia press on the Inaugural. (search)
ates which have resumed the powers formerly delegated by them to the Federal Government. Mr. Lincoln has committed a capital mistake — such a one as Talleyrand pronounced " worse than a crime." He has offended the American people. May we not soon look for an auxiliary revolution in the North--and the downfall of Black Republicanism --in the person of its imbecile head? At all events, we are confident that the Conservative Convention of Virginia will do its duty. We have elected true Virginians, whose action we can sustain without fear of tarnishing Virginia's honor, and with perfect confidence in their wisdom, patriotism and love for the institutions of our State. [from the Wheeling Union.] We have believed that war could have been prevented by the prompt and decisive action of Virginia. We have believed that she had it in her power to preserve peace, and at the same time to secure her own rights against any future violation. To this end we have advised, urged and imp