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tion be now put? was put and decided in the negative — ayes 55; noes 64. The question being open for debate, Mr. Segar said that hitherto he had been silent as to the great questions of Federal import which had been discussed off and on des, and declare war — do acts of war. Can Virginia, while she remains in the Union, declare war or do any acts of war? Mr. Segar believed the passage of the resolutions would involve an unconstitutional act, but he hoped the State would not tarnisheeing thereto, Mr. Seddon obtained the floor, and proceeded to answer the argument advanced by Messrs. Robertson and Segar, which he did at length, taking the Southern State-Rights view of the questions now agitating the public mind. Mr. SMr. Segar replied by correcting his friend from Stafford in relation to his misconceived views of his position. Mr. Kern obtained the floor, and commenced an argument against Collier's last proposition to strike out, which he continued for four hour
The Daily Dispatch: April 1, 1861., [Electronic resource], A Bostonian's view of affairs in Charleston. (search)
the question being on agreeing thereto, Mr. Cowan demanded the previous question, and the question being, shall the main question be now put? was put and decided in the negative — ayes 55; noes 64. The question being open for debate, Mr. Segar said that hitherto he had been silent as to the great questions of Federal import which had been discussed off and on during the session, but the extraordinary and revolutionary resolutions which had been sent from the Senate forbade his longerd States? And in this view, is not the act an unconstitutional act? Congress, alone, can raise and maintain armies and navies, and declare war — do acts of war. Can Virginia, while she remains in the Union, declare war or do any acts of war? Mr. Segar believed the passage of the resolutions would involve an unconstitutional act, but he hoped the State would not tarnish her fair fame by its perpetration. Let not her honor be thus soiled. Let the jewel of that honor sparkle, and sparkle on,
s authorized to order out such portion of the "militia of the State as he may deem necessary," and the question being on agreeing thereto, Mr. Seddon obtained the floor, and proceeded to answer the argument advanced by Messrs. Robertson and Segar, which he did at length, taking the Southern State-Rights view of the questions now agitating the public mind. Mr. Segar replied by correcting his friend from Stafford in relation to his misconceived views of his position. Mr. Kern obtaMr. Segar replied by correcting his friend from Stafford in relation to his misconceived views of his position. Mr. Kern obtained the floor, and commenced an argument against Collier's last proposition to strike out, which he continued for four hours, with many interruptions and calls to order. A call of the House being agreed on, several hours were consumed in calling the roll. The doors were locked, and the Sergeant-at-Arms dispatched after absentees, the members in the meantime amusing themselves in talking and other innocent amusements. At 4½ o'clock, Collier's amendment was adopted, on a call of the p